Simon Willison’s Weblog

92 items tagged “json”

Datasette: instantly create and publish an API for your SQLite databases

I just shipped the first public version of datasette, a new tool for creating and publishing JSON APIs for SQLite databases.

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Select Transform: JSON Template over JSON (via) A barrage of interesting ideas here. Having clients transmit up a JSON template which is then executed against data on the server and used to return exactly the data the client needs is just one of them (significant overlap with GraphQL there). # 18th October 2017, 5:12 pm

How does a web page interact with a server to parse a dynamic JSON file?

If you’re only dealing with 60 records there’s no need to add a full database. I’ve actually hand coded a 50 record JSON file before and it was fine- use an editor with good JSON support (I like Sublime Text 2) and it’s pretty easy to hand write.

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Has JSON pretty much replaced XML for string processing for the web, or are there use cases where XML is still necessary?

It’s replaced XML as the default format for most APIs. XML is still necessary for Atom/RSS feeds and other existing standards built on top of XML. It’s also a better choice than JSON for markup-style data—stuff like XHTML where tags are applied to sequences of characters within larger chunks of text.

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How can I parse unquoted JSON with JavaScript?

Unquoted JSON isn’t JSON—the JSON spec requires that strings are quoted (with double quotes, not single quotes).

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What are the JSON security concerns in web development?

Be very careful when implementing JSON-P for authenticated actions—evil third party sites could assemble URLs to your user’s private data and steal it. This attack has worked against Gmail in the past.

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Indexing JSON in Solr 3.1. The next release of Solr will support indexing documents provided as JSON—Solr currently requires incoming documents to be formatted as XML. # 10th December 2010, 9:46 am

I think the Web community has spoken, and it’s clear that what it wants is HTML5, JavaScript and JSON. XML isn’t going away but I see it being less and less a Web technology; it won’t be something that you send over the wire on the public Web, but just one of many technologies that are used on the server to manage and generate what you do send over the wire.

James Clark # 2nd December 2010, 6:48 pm

If I have data that loads using  json / JavaScript will it get indexed by Google?

No. Personally I dislike sites with content that is only accessible through JavaScript, but if you absolutely insist on doing this you should look in to implementing the Google Ajax Crawling mechanism: http://code.google.com/web/ajaxc...

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JSON sucks. [...] Every time I need to (correctly) represent a large integer such as 4611686018427387900, I’m forced to do so in a string. It causes me to throw up in mouth a little.

Theo Schlossnagle # 11th October 2010, 11:06 am

ijson. A SAX-style streaming JSON parser for Python, using ctypes to talk to the yajl C library. # 22nd September 2010, 9:59 pm

DNode: Asynchronous Remote Method Invocation for Node.js and the Browser. Mind-bendingly clever. DNode lets you expose a JavaScript function so that it can be called from another machine using a simple JSON-based network protocol. That’s relatively straight-forward... but DNode is designed for asynchronous environments, and so also lets you pass callback functions which will be translated in to references and used to make remote method invocations back to your original client. And to top it off, there’s a browser client library so you can perform the same trick over a WebSocket between a browser and a server. # 11th July 2010, 2:27 pm

The Guardian’s Open Platform is open for business. The Guardian’s Content API is now out of beta. Of particular interest: you can access basic article metadata (headline, URL and tags) without using an API key at all, and the API supports JSONP—just request format=json and include a callback=foo argument. # 20th May 2010, 5:40 pm

Google Charts release notes, February 2010. More new Google Charts Image API features I hadn’t noticed before: charts of large data sets can now be generated using a POST request, but the killer feature is the ability to add ?chof=validate to see useful error messages. ?chof=json is interesting too—it gives you back a JSON object detailing the coordinates of various interesting shapes on the associated chart, which you can then use to create your own image maps or JavaScript tooltips. It’s a shame it doesn’t support JSON-P. # 27th April 2010, 12:07 pm

The MessagePack Project. A cross-language efficient binary-based serialization library—“It’s like JSON, but very fast and small”. Claims to outperform protocol buffers for at least some benchmarks. # 21st April 2010, 10:55 pm

ElasticSearch: Your Data, Your Search. A neat example of how ElasticSearch’s schemaless indexes and native JSON support make it ridiculously easy to index different types of data and run queries across them. # 12th February 2010, 3:22 pm

Elastic Search (via) Solr has competition! Like Solr, Elastic Search provides a RESTful JSON HTTP interface to Lucene. The focus here is on distribution, auto-sharding and high availability. It’s even easier to get started with than Solr, partly due to the focus on providing a schema-less document store, but it’s currently missing out on a bunch of useful Solr features (a web interface and faceting are the two that stand out). The high availability features look particularly interesting. UPDATE: I was incorrect, basic faceted queries are already supported. # 11th February 2010, 6:33 pm

jsondns. A JSONP API for making DNS queries, with a nice URL structure. # 30th December 2009, 5:37 pm

Orderly JSON. Essentially the JSON equivalent of RelaxNG’s compact syntax—a pleasant mini-language for describing JSON objects which compiles to the more verbose JSONSchema format. # 23rd December 2009, 2:44 pm

Djangopeople JSON parser. Awesome—Andy McKay has compensated for the lack of an official DjangoPeople API by creating a JSONP screen scraped API and hosting it on App Engine. As far as I’m concerned this is an officially supported feature—I’ll make sure future site changes don’t break it, and when I do add an API I’ll try to keep it compatible and help Andy set up redirects. # 28th November 2009, 11:29 am

Introducing BERT and BERT-RPC. Justification for inventing a brand new serialisation protocol: Thrift and Protocol Buffers both use IDLs and code generation, XML “is not convertible to a simple unambiguous data structure in any language I’ve ever used” and JSON lacks support for unencoded binary data. The result is BERT—Binary ERlang Term—which extracts a format from Erlang in much the same way that JSON extracted one from JavaScript. # 21st October 2009, 10:11 pm

cloud-crowd. New parallel processing worker/job queue system with a strikingly elegant architecture. The central server is an HTTP server that manages job requests, which are farmed out to a number of node HTTP servers which fork off worker processes to do the work. All communication is webhook-style JSON, and the servers are implemented in Sinatra and Thin using a tiny amount of code. The web-based monitoring interface is simply beautiful, using canvas to display graphs showing the system’s overall activity. # 21st September 2009, 11:09 pm

“MongoDB is fantastic for logging”. Sounds tempting... high performance inserts, JSON structured records and capped collections if you only want to keep the past X entries. If you care about older historic data but still want to preserve space you could run periodic jobs to roll up log entries in to summarised records. It shouldn’t be too hard to write a command-line script that hooks in to Apache’s logging directive and writes records to MongoDB. # 26th August 2009, 7:09 pm

Tile Drawer (via) The most inspired use of EC2 I’ve seen yet: center a map on an area, pick a Cascadenik stylesheet URL (or write and link to your own) and Tile Drawer gives you an Amazon EC2 AMI and a short JSON snippet. Launch the AMI with the JSON as the “user data” parameter and you get your own OpenStreetMap tile rendering server, which self-configures on startup and starts rendering and serving tiles using your custom design. # 26th August 2009, 9:32 am

Announcing Alice and Wonderland. Continuing the RabbitMQ “stuff to do with rabbits” naming convention, Alice is a RESTful interface to RabbitMQ which exposes information about vhosts/queues/users/exchanges/etc as JSON. Wonderland is a web UI for RabbitMQ implemented as a pure Ajax application which calls Alice. # 17th July 2009, 9:12 am

MongoDB. Lots of discussions about this at EuroPython today—it’s a document database, very similar to CouchDB but significantly faster and suggested for production use. Best of all, trying it out on OS X is as easy as extracting the tarball and running “bin/mongod --dbpath /tmp/test-mongo-db run”. # 30th June 2009, 7:13 pm

Firefox 3.5 for developers. It’s out today, and the feature list is huge. Highlights include HTML 5 drag ’n’ drop, audio and video elements, offline resources, downloadable fonts, text-shadow, CSS transforms with -moz-transform, localStorage, geolocation, web workers, trackpad swipe events, native JSON, cross-site HTTP requests, text API for canvas, defer attribute for the script element and TraceMonkey for better JS performance! # 30th June 2009, 6:08 pm

disturbyte’s zenqueue. Simple, tiny and fast Python message queue server built on top of coroutines and Eventlet, using JSON over TCP as the message format. I’m impressed with how potentially useful this looks considering the small amount of code. The author benchmarks it at 28 thousand messages/second. # 11th May 2009, 1:27 pm

With YQL Execute, the Internet becomes your database. This is nuts (in a good way). Yahoo!’s intriguing universal SQL-style XML/JSONP web service interface now supports JavaScript as a kind of stored procedure language, meaning you can use JavaScript and E4X to screen-scrape web pages, then query the results with YQL. # 29th April 2009, 10:50 pm

Building Fast Client-side Searches. Flickr now lazily loads your entire contact list in to memory for auto-completion. Extensive benchmarking found that a control character delimited string was the fastest option for shipping thousands of contacts around as quickly as possible. # 19th March 2009, 3:35 pm