Simon Willison’s Weblog

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6 items tagged “jq”

2023

jq 1.7. First new release of jq in five years! The project has moved from a solo maintainer to a new team with a dedicated GitHub organization. A ton of new features in this release—I’m most excited about the new pick(.key1, .key2.nested) builtin for emitting a selected subset of the incoming objects, and the --raw-output0 option which outputs zero byte delimited lists, designed to be piped to “xargs -0”. # 2nd October 2023, 4:58 am

2022

jq language description (via) I love jq but I’ve always found it difficult to remember how to use it, and the manual hasn’t helped me as much as I would hope. It turns out the jq wiki on GitHub offers an alternative, more detailed description of the language which fits the way my brain works a lot better. # 26th April 2022, 7:04 pm

2021

jc (via) This is such a great idea: jc is a CLI tool which knows how to convert the output of dozens of different classic Unix utilities to JSON, so you can more easily process it programmatically, pipe it through jq and suchlike. “pipx install jc” to install, then “dig example.com | jc --dig” to try it out. # 5th December 2021, 11:05 pm

2019

datasette-jq (via) I released another tiny Datasette plugin: datasette-jq registers a single custom SQL function, jq(), which lets you execute the jq expression language against a JSON column (or literal value) to filter and transform the JSON data. The README includes a link to a live demo—it’s a neat way to play with the jq micro-language. # 30th May 2019, 1:52 am

2018

jq recipes. Remy Sharp’s handy collection of jq recipes, each one linking to an interactive demo on jqterm.com. I thought jq was just for extracting values from a JSON document—I hadn’t realized how powerful it was for modifying and extending those documents as well. # 22nd August 2018, 3:23 pm

gron. Ingenious tool for working with JSON on the command line: run “gron URL/filepath” to transform a JSON document into a multi-line assignment structure designed to be easy to run grep against. Grep it, then pipe it back into “gron --ungron” to convert the filtered data back to JSON again. It solves a similar problem to jq—which is addressed in the README: “gron’s primary purpose is to make it easy to find the path to a value in a deeply nested JSON blob when you don’t already know the structure; much of jq’s power is unlocked only once you know that structure”. # 3rd April 2018, 9:16 pm