Simon Willison’s Weblog

17 items tagged “rust”

2021

toyDB: references. toyDB is a “distributed SQL database in Rust, written as a learning project”, with its own implementations of SQL, raft, ACID transactions, B+trees and more. toyDB author Erik Grinaker has assembled a detailed set of references that he used to learn how to build a database—I’d love to see more projects do this, it’s really useful. # 19th July 2021, 12:18 am

Inserting One Billion Rows in SQLite Under a Minute (via) Avinash Sajjanshetty experiments with accelerating writes to a test table in SQLite, using various SQLite pragmas to accelerate inserts followed by a rewrite of Python code to Rust. Also of note: running the exact same code in PyPy saw a 3.5x speed-up! # 19th July 2021, 12:13 am

2020

Internet Archive Software Library: Flash (via) A fantastic new initiative from the Internet Archive: they’re now archiving Flash (.swf) files and serving them for modern browsers using Ruffle, a Flash Player emulator written in Rust and compiled to WebAssembly. They are fully interactive and audio works too. Considering the enormous quantity of creative material released in Flash over the decades this helps fill a big hole in the Internet’s cultural memory. # 19th November 2020, 9:19 pm

Get Started—Materialize. Materialize is a really interesting new database—“a streaming SQL materialized view engine”. It builds materialized views on top of streaming data sources (such as Kafka)—you define the view using a SQL query, then it figures out how to keep that view up-to-date automatically as new data streams in. It speaks the PostgreSQL protocol so you can talk to it using the psql tool or any PostgreSQL client library. The “get started” guide is particularly impressive: it uses a curl stream of the Wikipedia recent changes API, parsed using a regular expression. And it’s written in Rust, so installing it is as easy as downloading and executing a single binary (though I used Homebrew). # 1st June 2020, 10:11 pm

Deno 1.0. Deno is a new take on server-side JavaScript from a team lead by Ryan Dahl, who originally created Node.js. It’s built using Rust and crammed with fascinating ideas—like the ability to import code directly from a URL. # 13th May 2020, 11:38 pm

2019

Calling C functions from BigQuery with web assembly (via) Google BigQuery lets you define custom SQL functions in JavaScript, and it turns out they expose the WebAssembly.instantiate family of APIs. Which means you can write your UDD in C or Rust, compile it to WebAssembly and run it as part of your query! # 27th October 2019, 5:55 am

Terrarium by Fastly Labs. Fastly have been investing heavily in WebAssembly, which makes sense as it provides an excellent option for a sandboxed environment for executing server-side code at the edge of their CDN offering. Terrarium is their “playground for experimenting with edge-side WebAssembly”—it lets you write a program in Rust, C, TypeScript or Wat (WebAssembly text format), compile it to WebAssembly and deploy it to a URL with a single button-click. It’s just a demo for the moment so deployments only persist for 15 minutes, but it’s a fascinating sandbox to play around with. # 21st May 2019, 8:51 pm

Wasmer: a Python library for executing WebAssembly binaries. This is a really interesting new tool: “pip install wasmer” and now you can load code that has been compiled to WebAssembly and call those functions directly from Python. It’s built on top of the wasmer universal WebAssembly runtime, written over just the past year in Rust by a team lead by Syrus Akbary, the author of the Graphene GraphQL library for Python. # 16th April 2019, 6:04 pm

ripgrep is faster than {grep, ag, git grep, ucg, pt, sift} (via) Andrew Gallant’s post from September 2016 introducing ripgrep, the command-line grep tool he wrote using Rust (on top of the Rust regular expression library also written by Andrew). ripgrep is a beautifully designed CLI interface and is crazy fast, and this post describes how it gets its performance in a huge amount of detail, right down to comparing the different algorithmic approaches used by other similar tools. I recently learned that ripgrep ships as part of VS Code, which is why VS Code’s search-across-project feature is so fast. In fact, if you dig around in the OS X package you can find the rg binary already installed on your mac: find /Applications/Visual* | grep bin/rg # 16th April 2019, 5:52 pm

2018

Build impossible programs. Delightful talk by Julia Evans describing how she went about building a Ruby profiler in Rust despite having no knowledge of Ruby internals and only beginner’s knowledge of Rust. # 19th September 2018, 6:38 pm

Touring a Fast, Safe, and Complete(ish) Web Service in Rust. Brandur’s notes from building a high performance web service in Rust, using PostgreSQL via the Diesel ORM and the Rust actix-web framework which peovides Erlang-style actors and promise-based async concurrency. # 28th March 2018, 3:47 pm

2017

Boiling the Ocean, Incrementally—How Stylo Brought Rust and Servo to Firefox. Firefox Quantum is the product of an impressive, highly risky chain of software engineering—Rust, Servo, then Stylo. # 28th November 2017, 8:34 pm

Entering the Quantum Era—How Firefox got fast again and where it’s going to get faster. I’ve been trying out the beta of Firefox 57 and it’s fantastic. All of that work on Servo and Rust is definitely paying off! # 13th November 2017, 4:34 pm

How Sentry Receives 20 Billion Events Per Month While Preparing To Handle Twice That. RabbitMQ federation, nginx and HAProxy, Riak as a key/value store, data processing is still mainly Python with a little bit of Rust. As of July 2017 it’s all hosted on Google Cloud Platform. # 8th November 2017, 11:32 pm

Fun facts about Rust’s growing popularity. TIL Rust is used “on hundreds of millions of desktops via Dropbox”. And Rust developers are called Rustaceans. # 30th October 2017, 4:45 am

The Xi Text Engine CRDT (via) Xi is “a modern editor with a backend written in Rust”—an open-source text editor project from Google built on some very interesting computer science (Conflict-free Replicated Data Types). It’s a native editor with server-backed synchronization as a first-class concept. # 13th October 2017, 10:32 pm

fd (via) “A simple, fast and user-friendly alternative to find.” Written in rust, with a saner default command-line syntax than the regular find command. Microbenchmark shows it running 7x faster. Install it on OS X using “brew install fd”. # 8th October 2017, 9:27 pm