Simon Willison’s Weblog

398 items tagged “security”

2022

You can’t solve AI security problems with more AI

One of the most common proposed solutions to prompt injection attacks (where an AI language model backed system is subverted by a user injecting malicious input—“ignore previous instructions and do this instead”) is to apply more AI to the problem.

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However, six digits is a very small space to search through when you are a computer. The biggest problem is going to be getting lucky, it’s quite literally a one-in-a-million shot. Turns out you can brute force a TOTP code in about 2 hours if you are careful and the remote service doesn’t have throttling or rate limiting of authentication attempts.

Push notification two-factor auth considered harmful # 17th September 2022, 2:45 pm

Twitter pranksters derail GPT-3 bot with newly discovered “prompt injection” hack. I’m quoted in this Ars Technica article about prompt injection and the Remoteli.io Twitter bot. # 16th September 2022, 6:33 pm

I don’t know how to solve prompt injection

Some extended thoughts about prompt injection attacks against software built on top of AI language models such a GPT-3. This post started as a Twitter thread but I’m promoting it to a full blog entry here.

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Prompt injection attacks against GPT-3

Riley Goodside, yesterday:

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Discord History Tracker. Very interestingly shaped piece of software. You install and run a localhost web application on your own machine, then paste some JavaScript into the Discord Electron app’s DevTools console (ignoring the prominent messages there warning you not to paste anything into it). The JavaScript scrapes messages you can see in Discord and submits them back to that localhost application, which writes them to a SQLite database for you. It’s written in C# with ASP.NET Core, but complied executables are provided for Windows, macOS and Linux. I had to allow execution of four different unsigned binaries to get this working on my Mac. # 2nd September 2022, 9:37 pm

Bypassing macOS notarization (via) Useful tip from the geckodriver docs: if you’ve downloaded an executable file through your browser and now cannot open it because of the macOS quarantine feature, you can run “xattr -r -d com.apple.quarantine path-to-binary” to clear that flag so you can execute the file. # 13th August 2022, 12 am

datasette on Open Source Insights (via) Open Source Insights is “an experimental service developed and hosted by Google to help developers better understand the structure, security, and construction of open source software packages”. It calculates scores for packages using various automated heuristics. A JSON version of the resulting score card can be accessed using https://deps.dev/_/s/pypi/p/{package_name}/v/ # 11th August 2022, 1:06 am

Let websites framebust out of native apps (via) Adrian Holovaty makes a compelling case that it is Not OK that we allow native mobile apps to embed our websites in their own browsers, including the ability for them to modify and intercept those pages (it turned out today that Instagram injects extra JavaScript into pages loaded within the Instagram in-app browser). He compares this to frame-busting on the regular web, and proposes that the X-Frame-Options: DENY header which browsers support to prevent a page from being framed should be upgraded to apply to native embedded browsers as well. I’m not convinced that reusing X-Frame-Options: DENY would be the best approach—I think it would break too many existing legitimate uses—but a similar option (or a similar header) specifically for native apps which causes pages to load in the native OS browser instead sounds like a fantastic idea to me. # 10th August 2022, 10:29 pm

Microsoft® Open Source Software (OSS) Secure Supply Chain (SSC) Framework Simplified Requirements. This is really good: don’t get distracted by the acronyms, skip past the intro and head straight to the framework practices section, which talks about things like keeping copies of the packages you depend on, running scanners, tracking package updates and most importantly keeping an inventory of the open source packages you work so you can quickly respond to things like log4j. I feel like I say this a lot these days, but if you had told teenage-me that Microsoft would be publishing genuinely useful non-FUD guides to open source supply chain security by 2022 I don’t think I would have believed you. # 6th August 2022, 4:49 pm

SOC2 is about the security of the company, not the company’s products. A SOC2 audit would tell you something about whether the customer support team could pop a shell on production machines; it wouldn’t tell you anything about whether an attacker could pop a shell with a SQL Injection vulnerability.

Thomas Ptacek # 7th July 2022, 8:31 pm

How to Temporarily Disable Face ID or Touch ID, and Require a Passcode to Unlock Your iPhone or iPad. Hold down the power and volume up buttons for a couple of seconds, and your iPhone will no longer allow you to use FaceID to unlock it without first entering your passcode. # 6th July 2022, 5:38 pm

Consistent with the practices outlined in SP 800-63B, agencies must remove password policies that require special characters and regular password rotation from all systems within one year of the issuance of this memorandum. These requirements have long been known to lead to weaker passwords in real-world use and should not be employed by the Federal Government.

Memo: Moving the U.S. Government Toward Zero Trust Cybersecurity Principles # 27th January 2022, 7:18 pm

Before May 2021, the master key in MetaMask was called the “Seed Phrase”. Through user research and insights from our customer support team, we have concluded that this name does not properly convey the critical importance that this master key has for user security. This is why we will be changing our naming of this master key to “Secret Recovery Phrase”. Through May and June of 2021, we will be phasing out the use of “seed phrase” in our application and support articles, and eventually exclusively calling it a “Secret Recovery Phrase.” No action is required, this is only a name change. We will be rolling this out on both the extension and the mobile app for all users.

MetaMask Support # 9th January 2022, 5:44 am

2021

A deep dive into an NSO zero-click iMessage exploit: Remote Code Execution (via) Fascinating and terrifying description of an extremely sophisticated attack against iMessage. iMessage was passing incoming image bytes through to a bunch of different libraries to figure out which image format should be decoded, including a PDF renderer that supported the old JBIG2 compression format. JBIG2 includes a mechanism for programatically swapping the values of individual black and white pixels... which turns out to be Turing complete, and means that a sufficiently cunning “image” can include a full computer architecture defined in terms of logical bit operations. Combine this with an integer overflow and you can perform arbitrary memory operations that break out of the iOS sandbox. # 16th December 2021, 8:33 pm

s3-credentials: a tool for creating credentials for S3 buckets

I’ve built a command-line tool called s3-credentials to solve a problem that’s been frustrating me for ages: how to quickly and easily create AWS credentials (an access key and secret key) that have permission to read or write from just a single S3 bucket.

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How to win at CORS (via) Jake Archibald’s definitive guide to CORS, including a handy CORS playground interactive tool. Also includes a useful history explaining why we need CORS in the first place. # 12th October 2021, 2:07 pm

New tool: an nginx playground. Julia Evans built a sandbox tool for interactively trying out an nginx configuration and executing test requests through it. I love this kind of tool, and Julia’s explanation of how they built it using a tiny fly.io instance and a network namespace to reduce the amount of damage any malicious usage could cause is really interesting. # 24th September 2021, 6:44 pm

API Tokens: A Tedious Survey. Thomas Ptacek reviews different approaches to implementing secure API tokens, from simple random strings stored in a database through various categories of signed token to exotic formats like Macaroons and Biscuits, both new to me. Macaroons carry a signed list of restrictions with them, but combine it with a mechanism where a client can add their own additional restrictions, sign the combination and pass the token on to someone else. Biscuits are similar, but “embed Datalog programs to evaluate whether a token allows an operation”. # 25th August 2021, 12:12 am

MDN: Subdomain takeovers (via) MDN have a page about subdomain takeover attacks that focuses more on CNAME records: if you have a CNAME pointing to a common delegated hosting provider but haven’t yet provisioned your virtual host there, someone else might beat you to it and use it for an XSS attack. “Preventing subdomain takeovers is a matter of order of operations in lifecycle management for virtual hosts and DNS.” I now understand why Google Cloud make your “prove” your ownership of a domain before they’ll let you configure it to host e.g. a Cloud Run instance. # 22nd August 2021, 5:31 am

I stumbled across a nasty XSS hole involving DNS A records. Found out today that an old subdomain that I had assigned an IP address to via a DNS A record was serving unexpected content—turned out I’d shut down the associated VPS and the IP had been recycled to someone else, so their content was now appearing under my domain. It strikes me that if you got really unlucky this could turn into an XSS hole—and that new server could even use Let’s Encrypt to obtain an HTTPS certificate for your subdomain. I’ve added “audit your A records” to my personal security checklist. # 22nd August 2021, 5:27 am

Exploring the SameSite cookie attribute for preventing CSRF

In reading Yan Zhu’s excellent write-up of the JSON CSRF vulnerability she found in OkCupid one thing puzzled me: I was under the impression that browsers these days default to treating cookies as SameSite=Lax, so I would expect attacks like the one Yan described not to work in modern browsers.

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OkCupid had a CSRF vulnerability (via) Good write-up of a (now fixed) CSRF vulnerability on OkCupid. Their site worked by POSTing JSON objects to an API. JSON POSTs are usually protected against CSRF because they can only be sent using fetch() or XMLHttpRequest, which are protected by the same-origin policy. Yan Zhu notes that you can use the enctype=“text/plain” attribute on a form (introduced in HTML5) and a crafty hidden input element with name=’{“foo”:“’ value=’bar”}’ to construct JSON in an off-site form, which enabled CSRF attacks. # 2nd August 2021, 10:12 pm

Beginning in M94, Chrome will offer HTTPS-First Mode, which will attempt to upgrade all page loads to HTTPS and display a full-page warning before loading sites that don’t support it. Users who enable this mode gain confidence that Chrome is connecting them to sites over HTTPS whenever possible, and that they will see a warning before connecting to sites over HTTP. Based on ecosystem feedback, we’ll explore making HTTPS-First mode the default for all users in the future.

Chromium Blog # 14th July 2021, 7:14 pm

Probably Are Gonna Need It: Application Security Edition (via) Jacob Kaplan-Moss shares his PAGNIs for application security: “basic security mitigations that are easy to do at the beginning, but get progressively harder the longer you put them off”. Plenty to think about in here—I particularly like Jacob’s recommendation to build a production-to-staging database mirroring solution that works from an allow-list of columns, to avoid the risk of accidentally exposing new private data as the product continues to evolve. # 8th July 2021, 6:31 pm

Weeknotes: New releases across nine different projects

A new release and security patch for Datasette, plus releases of sqlite-utils, datasette-auth-passwords, django-sql-dashboard, datasette-upload-csvs, xml-analyser, datasette-placekey, datasette-mask-columns and db-to-sqlite.

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Reflected cross-site scripting issue in Datasette (via) Here’s the GitHub security advisory I published for the XSS hole in Datasette. The fix is available in versions 0.57 and 0.56.1, both released today. # 5th June 2021, 11:14 pm

M1RACLES: M1ssing Register Access Controls Leak EL0 State. You need to read (or at least scan) all the way to the bottom: this security disclosure is a masterpiece. It not only describes a real flaw in the M1 silicon but also deconstructs the whole culture of over-hyped name-branded vulnerability reports. The TLDR is that you don’t really need to worry about this one, and if you’re writing this kind if thing up for a news article you should read all the way to the end first! # 26th May 2021, 3:25 pm

Over the past several months, everyone in the industry who provides any kind of free CPU resources has been dealing with a massive outbreak of abuse for cryptocurrency mining. The industry has been setting up informal working groups to pool knowledge of mitigations, communicate when our platforms are being leveraged against one another, and cumulatively wasting thousands of hours of engineering time implementing measures to deal with this abuse, and responding as attackers find new ways to circumvent them.

Drew DeVault, SourceHut # 26th April 2021, 11:52 pm

Why you shouldn’t use ENV variables for secret data (via) I do this all the time, but this article provides a good set of reasons that secrets in environment variables are a bad pattern—even when you know there’s no multi-user access to the host you are deploying to. The biggest problem is that they often get captured by error handling scripts, which may not have the right code in place to redact them. This article suggests using Docker secrets instead, but I’d love to see a comprehensive write-up of other recommended patterns for this that go beyond applications running in Docker. # 14th April 2021, 6:22 pm