Simon Willison’s Weblog

524 items tagged “django”

2021

django-upgrade (via) Adam Johnson’s new CLI tool for upgrading Django projects by automatically applying changes to counter deprecations made in different versions of the framework. Uses the Python standard library tokenize module which gives it really quick performance in parsing and rewriting Python code. Exciting to see this kind of codemod approach becoming more common in Python world—JavaScript developers use this kind of thing a lot. # 26th September 2021, 5:42 am

Django SQL Dashboard 1.0

Earlier this week I released Django SQL Dashboard 1.0. I also just released 1.0.1, with a bug fix for PostgreSQL 10 contributed by Ryan Cheley.

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Django SQL Dashboard 1.0 (via) As part of my ongoing attempt to be braver about 1.0 releases (crucial if you want to do semantic versioning properly) I’ve released version 1.0 of Django SQL Dashboard, my Datasette-inspired app for Django that adds an interface for running read-only, bookmarkable SQL queries against a PostgreSQL database. The new version adds a column cog menu providing shortcuts for changing the sort order, counting distinct values and performing a group-by/count against column values. # 1st July 2021, 5:44 pm

Django for Startup Founders: A better software architecture for SaaS startups and consumer apps (via) The opening section of this article has very little to do with Django: it’s an insightful description of the technical challenges faced by a startup that is still seeking product-market fit. Alex then extends that into his own architectural recommendations for startups building with Django to help waste as little time as possible on problems that aren’t core to the product they are building. # 24th June 2021, 8:43 pm

HackSoft Django styleguide: services and selectors. HackSoft’s Django styleguide uses the terms “services” and “selectors”. Services are functions that live in services.py and perform business logic operations such as creating new entities that might span multiple Django models. Selectors live in selectors.py and perform more complex database read operations, such as returning objects in a way that respects visibility permissions. # 24th May 2021, 7:17 pm

Django SQL Dashboard

I’ve released the first non-alpha version of Django SQL Dashboard, which provides an interface for running arbitrary read-only SQL queries directly against a PostgreSQL database, protected by the Django authentication scheme. It can also be used to create saved dashboards that can be published or shared internally.

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Adding GeoDjango to an existing Django project

Work on VIAL for Vaccinate The States continues.

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Weeknotes: Vaccinate The States, and how I learned that returning dozens of MB of JSON works just fine these days

On Friday VaccinateCA grew in scope, a lot: we launched a new website called Vaccinate The States. Patrick McKenzie wrote more about the project here—the short version is that we’re building the most comprehensive possible dataset of vaccine availability in the USA, using a combination of data collation, online research and continuing to make a huge number of phone calls.

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Porting VaccinateCA to Django

As I mentioned back in February, I’ve been working with the VaccinateCA project to try to bring the pandemic to an end a little earlier by helping gather as accurate a model as possible of where the Covid vaccine is available in California and how people can get it.

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Weeknotes: django-sql-dashboard widgets

A few small releases this week, for django-sql-dashboard, datasette-auth-passwords and datasette-publish-vercel.

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Weeknotes: tableau-to-sqlite, django-sql-dashboard

This week I started a limited production run of my new backend for Vaccinate CA calling, built a tableau-to-sqlite import tool and started working on a subset of Datasette for PostgreSQL and Django called django-sql-dashboard.

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Drawing the rest of the owl

My ambitious goal for the day was to get the new Django/PostgreSQL preview into a state where we could start sending example API requests to it from the help.vaccinate app.

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Trying to end the pandemic a little earlier with VaccinateCA

This week I got involved with the VaccinateCA effort. We are trying to end the pandemic a little earlier, by building the most accurate database possible of vaccination locations and availability in California.

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Django admin customization, JSON in our PostgreSQL

My progress slowed a bit today as I started digging into some things I’m less familiar with—but I’ve found some tricks that I think will help us out a lot.

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Importing data from Airtable into Django, plus a search engine for all our code

I made a bunch of progress on the Django backend prototype-that-soon-won’t-be-a-prototype today.

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Spinning up a new Django app to act as a backend for VaccinateCA

My goal by the end of this week is to have a working proof of concept for a Django + PostgreSQL app that can replace Airtable as the principle backend for the https://www.vaccinateca.com/ site. This proof of concept will allow us to make a go or no-go decision and figure out what else needs to be implemented before we can start using it to track calls.

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2020

The trouble with transaction.atomic (via) David Seddon provides a detailed explanation of Django’s nestable transaction.atomic() context manager and describes a gotcha that can occur if you lose track of whether your code is already running in a transaction block, since you may be working with savepoints instead—along with some smart workarounds. # 20th November 2020, 3:57 pm

Bedrock: The SQLitening (via) Back in March 2018 www.mozilla.org switched over to running on Django using SQLite! They’re using the same pattern I’ve been exploring with Datasette: their SQLite database is treated as a read-only cache by their frontend servers, and a new SQLite database is built by a separate process and fetched onto the frontend machines every five minutes by a scheduled task. They have a healthcheck page which shows the latest version of the database and when it was fetched, and even lets you download the 25MB SQLite database directly (I’ve been exploring it using Datasette). # 7th October 2020, 11:47 pm

Inevitably we got round to talking about async. As much of an unneeded complication as it is for so many day-to-day use-cases, it’s important for Python because, if and when you do need the high throughput handling of these io-bound use-cases, you don’t want to have to switch language. The same for Django: most of what you’re doing has no need of async but you don’t want to have to change web framework just because you need a sprinkling of non-blocking IO.

Carlton Gibson # 27th September 2020, 3:09 pm

Pysa: An open source static analysis tool to detect and prevent security issues in Python code (via) Interesting new static analysis tool for auditing Python for security vulnerabilities—things like SQL injection and os.execute() calls. Built by Facebook and tested extensively on Instagram, a multi-million line Django application. # 7th August 2020, 8:50 pm

James Bennett on why Django should not support JWT in core (via) The topic of adding JWT support to Django core comes up occasionally—here’s James Bennett’s detailed argument for not doing that. The short version is that the JWT specification isn’t just difficult to implement securely: it’s fundamentally flawed, which results in things like five implementations in three different languages all manifesting the same vulnerability. Third party modules exist that add JWT support to Django, but baking it into core would act as a form of endorsement and Django’s philosophy has always been to encourage people towards best practices. # 1st August 2020, 12:28 am

PostgreSQL full-text search in the Django Admin. Today I figured out how to use PostgreSQL full-text search in the Django admin for my blog, using the get_search_results method on a subclass of ModelAdmin. # 25th July 2020, 11:05 pm

How to find what you want in the Django documentation (via) Useful guide by Matthew Segal to navigating the Django documentation, and tips for reading documentation in general. The Django docs have a great reputation so it’s easy to forget how intimidating they can be for newcomers: Matthew emphasizes that docs are rarely meant to be read in full: the trick is learning how to quickly search them for the things you need to understand right now. # 3rd July 2020, 3:04 pm

Django Release Cycle (via) Really nice visual representation of Django’s release cycle, built by Jeff Triplett as a remix of the Python release cycle by Dustin Ingram. # 3rd April 2020, 4:56 pm

Django: Added support for asynchronous views and middleware (via) An enormously consequential feature just landed in Django, and is set to ship as part of Django 3.1 in August. Asynchronous views will allow Django applications to define views using “async def myview(request)”—taking full advantage of Python’s growing asyncio ecosystem and providing enormous performance improvements for Django sites that do things like hitting APIs over HTTP. Andrew has been puzzling over this for ages and it’s really exciting to see it land in a form that should be usable in a stable Django release in just a few months. # 19th March 2020, 3:43 am

New governance model for the Django project. This has been under discussion for a long time: I’m really excited to see it put into action. It’s difficult to summarize, but they key effect should be a much more vibrant, active set of people involved in making decisions about the framework. # 12th March 2020, 5:27 pm

Weeknotes: datasette-auth-existing-cookies and datasette-sentry

Work on Datasette Cloud continues—I’m tantalizingly close to having a MVP I can start to invite people to try out.

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2019

Logging to SQLite using ASGI middleware

I had some fun playing around with ASGI middleware and logging during our flight back to England for the holidays.

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The first ever commit to Sentry (via) This is fascinating: the first 70 lines of code that started the Sentry error tracking project. It’s a straight-forward Django process_exception() middleware method that collects the traceback and the exception class and saves them to a database. The trick of using the md5 hash of the traceback message to de-dupe errors has been there from the start, and remains one of my favourite things about the design of Sentry. # 6th November 2019, 11:08 pm

Using dependabot to bump Django on my blog from 2.2 to 2.2.1 (via) GitHub recently acquired dependabot and made it free, and I decided to try it out on my blog. It’s a really neat piece of automation: it scans your requirements.txt (plus a number of other packaging definitions across several different languages), checks for updates to your dependencies and opens pull requests against any that it finds. Combine it with a CI service such as Circle CI and your tests will run automatically against the pull request, letting you know if it’s safe to merge. dependabot constantly rebases other changes against the pull request to try and ensure it will merge as cleanly as possible. # 27th May 2019, 1:24 am