Simon Willison’s Weblog

9 items tagged “heroku”

Try hosting on PyPy by simonw. I had a go at hosting my blog on PyPy. Thanks to the combination of Travis CI, Sentry and Heroku it was pretty easy to give it a go—I had to swap psycopg2 for psycopg2cffi and switch to the currently undocumented pypy3-5.8.0 Heroku runtime (pypy3-5.5.0 is only compatible with Python 3.3, which Django 2.0 does not support). I ran it in production for a few minutes and didn’t get any Sentry errors but did end up using more Heroku dyno memory than I’m comfortable with—see the graph I posted in a comment. I’m going to stick with CPython 3.6 for the moment. Amusingly I did almost all of the work on this on my phone! Travis CI means it’s easy to create and test a branch through GitHub’s web UI, and deploying a tested branch to Heroku is then just a button click. # 5th November 2017, 7:17 pm

Using “import refs” to iteratively import data into Django

I’ve been writing a few scripts to backfill my blog with content I originally posted elsewhere. So far I’ve imported answers I posted on Quora (background), answers I posted on Ask MetaFilter and content I recovered from the Internet Archive.

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Squeezing every drop of performance out of a Django app on Heroku. Ben Firshman describes some lesser known tricks for scaling Django on Heroku—in particular, using gunicorn gevent asynchronous workers and setting up PostgreSQL connection pooling using django-db-geventpool. # 31st October 2017, 2:08 pm

Porting my blog to Python 3

This blog is now running on Python 3! Admittedly this is nearly nine years after the first release of Python 3.0, but it’s the first Python 3 project I’ve deployed myself so I’m pretty excited about it.

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How to set up world-class continuous deployment using free hosted tools

I’m going to describe a way to put together a world-class continuous deployment infrastructure for your side-project without spending any money.

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Running gunicorn behind nginx on Heroku for buffering and logging

Heroku’s default setup for Django uses the gunicorn application server. Each Heroku dyno can only run a limited number of gunicorn workers, which means a limited number of requests can be served in parallel (around 4 per dyno is a good rule of thumb).

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What’s the cheapest or free stack solution to deploy and experiment with a realtime application in 2016?

Heroku have a good free tier, and comprehensive support for deploying both Python and Node.js. If you are mainly interested in realtime I would suggest starting out with Node.js on Heroku. Depending on the complexity of your project you might even be able to use raw Node.js without adding something like Express.

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For a Django application, deployed on Heroku, what are my options for storing user-uploaded media files?

S3 is really a no-brainer for this, it’s extremely inexpensive, very easy to integrate with and unbelievably reliable. It’s so cheap that it will be practically free for testing purposes (expect to spend pennies a month on it).

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The New Heroku (Part 4 of 4): Erosion-resistance & Explicit Contracts. I really like Adam’s description of Software Erosion—I’ve seen that happen to my projects a bunch of times, and it really is an important problem to solve. # 29th June 2011, 5:26 pm