Simon Willison’s Weblog

26 items tagged “nosql”

NoSQL: What is the “best” solution for storing high volumes of structured data?

On the right setup, PostgreSQL can handle petabytes. There are also commercial vendors such as Greenplum that offer data warehouse solutions built on a modified version of PostgreSQL.

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How was FriendFeed’s schema less db faster than pure MySQL?

The principle reason they switched to a schemaless DB was to work around the challenges of having to make schemes changes in MySQL, which can lock the table and take hours if bit days to complete in large tables.

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How could we using couchbase with binary document as value?

There’s a system called cbfs that acts as a distributed blobstore on top of Couchbase server—https://github.com/couchbaselabs...—it looks like it is currently under active development.

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Any source available to download sample data (in 10+ GB) for testing?

Wikipedia has some pretty interesting dumps, in both XML and SQL format: http://meta.wikimedia.org/wiki/I...

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NoSQL: Whats the simplest on disk key-value storage?

Surprisingly there doesn’t seem to be an obvious answer to this. Here are a few options:

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What is the best NoSQL database to store unstructured data?

Any of the document stores are worth a look—I’d suggest investigating MongoDB, Riak and CouchDB.

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NoSQL: On a shared server, what are the alternatives to using SQL?

You could probably run Redis on a shared server—it doesn’t need to be installed as root, but it does require a process to run all the time which shared hosts may not allow.

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Benchmarks for scalability in NoSQL systems?

NoSQL systems are enormously varied which makes it hard (and not particularly constructive) to benchmark them against each other. How would you compare the performance of Redis, an in-memory data structure server, with Cassandra, a distributed redundant column store?

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What are the best blogs about NoSQL?

myNoSQL is excellent: http://nosql.mypopescu.com/

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What are the pros and cons of switching from MySQL to one of the NoSQL databases?

Pro: If your own benchmarks tell you you need to switch to a specific NoSQL solution, you’ll know exactly what the pro is.

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What are the advantages and disadvantages of using MongoDB vs CouchDB vs Cassandra vs Redis?

I see Redis as a different category from the other three—kind of like you wouldn’t say “what are the advantages of MySQL v.s. Memcached”. Redis makes an excellent complement to pretty much any other persistent storage mechanism. I expanded on this here: http://simonwillison.net/2009/Oc...

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Using MySQL as a NoSQL—A story for exceeding 750,000 qps on a commodity server. Very interesting approach: much of the speed difference between MySQL/InnoDB and memcached is due to the overhead involved in parsing and processing SQL, so the team at DeNA wrote their own MySQL plugin, HandlerSocket, which exposes a NoSQL-style network protocol for directly calling the low level MySQL storage engine APIs—resulting in a 7.5x performance increase. # 27th October 2010, 11:10 pm

Will Redis support per-database persistence configuration?

I don’t know if that’s on the roadmap (you’d need to ask antirez on the mailing list or Twitter), but it should be easy enough to run multiple Redis instances with different settings—especially on a multi core machine.

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What is the largest production deployment of CouchDB for online use?

The BBC have a pretty big CouchDB cluster, which they use mostly as a replicated key-value store. It’s used by their new identity platform which includes customisation features for iPlayer.

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reddit’s May 2010 “State of the Servers” report. An interesting Cassandra war story: Cassandra scales up, but it doesn’t scale down very well: running with just three nodes can make recovery from problems a lot more tricky. # 18th May 2010, 6:37 pm

Comprehensive notes from my three hour Redis tutorial

Last week I presented two talks at the inaugural NoSQL Europe conference in London. The first was presented with Matthew Wall and covered the ways in which we have been exploring NoSQL at the Guardian. The second was a three hour workshop on Redis, my favourite piece of software to have the NoSQL label applied to it.

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Redis weekly update #3—Pub/Sub and more. Redis is now a publish/subscribe server—and it ended up only taking 150 lines of C code since Redis internals were already based on that paradigm. # 30th March 2010, 3:15 pm

VMware: the new Redis home. Redis creator Salvatore Sanfilippo is joining VMWare to work on Redis full time. Sounds like a good match. # 16th March 2010, 11:26 am

Redis weekly update #1—Hashes and... many more! Hashes were the big missing data type in Redis—support is only partial at the moment (no ability to list all keys in a hash or delete a specific key) but at the rate Redis is developed I expect that to be fixed within a week or two. # 13th March 2010, 12:06 am

A Collection Of Redis Use Cases. Lots of interesting case studies here, collated by Mathias Meyer. Redis clearly shines for anything involving statistics or high volumes of small writes. # 16th February 2010, 3:04 pm

FleetDB (via) Yet Another Key-Value Store: Schema-free, JSON protocol, everything cached in RAM, append-only log for durability, multi-record transactions... but what’s really interesting about this one is that it’s written in Clojure and takes full advantage of that language’s concurrency primitives. The prefix operators used by the select API hint at its Lisp heritage. # 5th January 2010, 11:21 am

New Redis ZINCRBY command (via) Just added to Redis, a command which increments the “score” for an item in a sorted set and reorders the set to reflect the new scores. Looks ideally suited to real time stats, and I’m sure there are plenty of other exciting uses for it. # 22nd December 2009, 8:38 pm

Crowdsourced document analysis and MP expenses

As you may have heard, the UK government released a fresh batch of MP expenses documents a week ago on Thursday. I spent that week working with a small team at Guardian HQ to prepare for the release. Here’s what we built:

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Node.js is genuinely exciting

I gave a talk on Friday at Full Frontal, a new one day JavaScript conference in my home town of Brighton. I ended up throwing away my intended topic (JSONP, APIs and cross-domain security) three days before the event in favour of a technology which first crossed my radar less than two weeks ago.

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When I worked at Amazon.com we had a deeply-ingrained hatred for all of the SQL databases in our systems. Now, we knew perfectly well how to scale them through partitioning and other means. But making them highly available was another matter. Replication and failover give you basic reliability, but it’s very limited and inflexible compared to a real distributed datastore with master-master replication, partition tolerance, consensus and/or eventual consistency, or other availability-oriented features.

Matt Brubeck # 4th October 2009, 9:50 am

Looking to the future with Cassandra. Digg are now using Cassandra for their “green badge” (one of your friends have dugg this story) feature—the resulting denormalised dataset weighs in at 3 TB and 76 billion columns. # 9th September 2009, 9:26 pm