Simon Willison’s Weblog

12 items tagged “twisted”

node-v0.1.30 (via) A very significant new release of Node.js: the Twisted/Dojo-style Promise abstraction has been removed entirely, causing backwards incompatible changes to a bunch of core APIs. This means the pseudo-blocking Promise.wait() method is gone too, making it even harder to accidentally block your event loop. Instead, user-level libraries are encouraged to add Promise-style abstractions. I’m pleased to see Node sticking to the low-level stuff. # 22nd February 2010, 7 pm

Socket Benchmark of Asynchronous Servers in Python. A comparison of eight different asynchronous networking frameworks in Python. Tornado comes out on top in most of the benchmarks, but the post is most interesting for the direct comparison of simple code examples for each of the frameworks. # 22nd December 2009, 10:34 pm

Perl: Love it, or hate it, but don’t ignore it. Phillip Smith calls me out for omitting Perl from my list of Node.js event loop alternatives (I only mentioned Twisted and EventMachine). No conspiracy here, I’m just not connected enough to the Perl community to know what the popular event loop libraries are. To Perl’s credit, Perlbal was the first piece of software I saw that showed me how a single threaded, event loop based system could massively outperform a threaded alternative. # 27th November 2009, 7:51 am

Node.js is genuinely exciting

I gave a talk on Friday at Full Frontal, a new one day JavaScript conference in my home town of Brighton. I ended up throwing away my intended topic (JSONP, APIs and cross-domain security) three days before the event in favour of a technology which first crossed my radar less than two weeks ago.

[... 2009 words]

node.js. “Evented I/O for V8 JavaScript”—a JavaScript environment built on top of the super-fast V8 engine which provides event-based IO functionality for building highly concurrent TCP and HTTP servers. The API design is superb—everything is achieved using JavaScript events and callbacks (even regular file IO) and the small standard library ships with comprehensive support for HTTP and DNS. Overall it’s very similar to Twisted and friends, but JavaScript’s anonymous function syntax feels more natural than the Python equivalent. It compiles cleanly on Snow Leopard. Definitely a project to watch. # 9th November 2009, 11:25 pm

Twisted inlineCallbacks and deferredGenerator. inlineCallbacks are a brilliant (but seemingly under-promoted) feature of Twisted which use the ability to return a value from a yield statement to make asynchronous callbacks look much more like regular sequential programming. # 25th October 2009, 11:30 pm

Introducing Cloudera Desktop. It’s a GUI for Hadoop, and under the hood is a whole stack of open source software, including Python, Django, MooTools, Twisted, lxml, CherryPy, Mako, Java and AspectJ. # 21st October 2009, 6:48 pm

Twisted Web in 60 seconds. A common complaint about Twisted is how hard it is to figure out the web stack. Jp Calderon’s tutorial (in nine installments and counting) is the best documentation on web development in Twisted I’ve seen. # 8th October 2009, 11:48 am (via) A Twisted/Python powered comet API for pushing out Subversion commits, built for Apache Foundation projects. # 6th September 2009, 9:50 pm

Exploring OAuth-Protected APIs. One of the downsides of OAuth is that it makes debugging APIs in your browser much harder. Seth Fitzsimmons’ oauth-proxy solves this by running a Twisted-powered proxy on your local machine which OAuth-signs every request going through it using your consumer key, secret and tokens for that API. Using it with a browsers risks exposing your key and token (but not secret) to sites you accidentally browse to—it would be useful if you could pass a whitelist of API domains as a command line option to the proxy. # 23rd August 2009, 11:06 am

Python logging from multiple processes. Use Python’s socket log handler to send all log messages to a single server—the python-loggingserver project implements such a server as a Twisted application with a handy web interface for viewing the aggregated logs. # 13th August 2009, 11:55 pm

Introducing Yardbird. I absolutely love it—an IRC bot built on top of Twisted that passes incoming messages off to Django code running in a separate thread. Requests and Response objects are used to represent incoming and outgoing messages, and Django’s regex-based URL routing is used to dispatch messages to different handling functions based on their content. # 22nd May 2009, 11:13 pm