Simon Willison’s Weblog

9 items tagged “visualization”

datasette-vega (via) I wrote a visualization plugin for Datasette that uses the excellent Vega “visualization grammar” library to provide bar, line and scatter charts configurable against any Datasette table or SQL query. # 29th June 2018, 3 pm

Datasette plugins, and building a clustered map visualization

Datasette now supports plugins!

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Visualizing disk IO activity using log-scale banded graphs (via) This is a neat data visualization trick: to display rates of disk I/O, it splits the rate into a GB, MB and KB section on a stacked chart. This means that if you are getting jitter in the order of KBs even while running at 400+MB/second you can see the jitter in the KB section. # 11th April 2018, 5:04 pm

Vega-Lite. A “high-level grammar of interactive graphics”. Part of the Vega project, which provides a mechanism for creating declarative visualizations by defining them using JSON. Vega-Lite is particularly interesting to me because it makes extremely tasteful decisions about how data should be visualized—give it some records, tell it which properties to plot on an axis and it will default to a display that makes sense for that data. The more I play with this the more impressed I am at the quality of its default settings. # 28th March 2018, 5:22 pm

Observable: An Earthquake Globe in Ten Minutes. Well worth your time. Jeremy Ashkenas uses Observable to live-code an interactive visualization of recent earthquakes around the world, using USGS data (fetched as JSON), d3, topoJSON and an Observable notebook. I’m sold—this is truly ground-breaking new technology. # 31st January 2018, 5:01 pm

Exploring Line Lengths in Python Packages. Interesting exploration of the impact if the 79 character length limit rule of thumb on various Python packages—and a thoroughly useful guide to histogram plotting in Jupyter, pandas and matplotlib. # 10th November 2017, 3:34 pm

Generating interactive HTML charts from Python?

D3 is absolutely amazing but the learning curve is a bit steep. Totally worth the effort to learn it in the long run, but it’s not so useful if you want to get something done quickly.

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Visualization Strategies: Text & Documents. “List of ...” style posts usually make me want to stab someone with a fork; this is how that kind of post should be done—well researched, carefully written and, most importantly doesn’t call itself a “Top X Ys that will Z your ZZ”! # 22nd August 2008, 11:17 am

Designing Google Reader’s trends. “But beyond the visualization, this serves as a good example of collecting and understanding the ambient information that flows through our digital lives.” # 15th January 2007, 12:53 am