Simon Willison’s Weblog

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533 items tagged “generativeai”

2023

Weeknotes: the Datasette Cloud API, a podcast appearance and more

Datasette Cloud now has a documented API, plus a podcast appearance, some LLM plugins work and some geospatial excitement.

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Talking Large Language Models with Rooftop Ruby

I’m on the latest episode of the Rooftop Ruby podcast with Collin Donnell and Joel Drapper, talking all things LLM.

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Looking at LLMs as chatbots is the same as looking at early computers as calculators. We’re seeing an emergence of a whole new computing paradigm, and it is very early.

Andrej Karpathy # 28th September 2023, 8:50 pm

Finding Bathroom Faucets with Embeddings. Absolutely the coolest thing I’ve seen someone build on top of my LLM tool so far: Drew Breunig is renovating a bathroom and needed a way to filter through literally thousands of options for facet taps. He scraped 20,000 images of fixtures from a plumbing supply site and used LLM to embed every one of them via CLIP... and now he can ask for “faucets that look like this one”, or even run searches for faucets that match “Gawdy” or “Bond Villain” or “Nintendo 64”. Live demo included! # 27th September 2023, 6:18 pm

The profusion of dubious A.I.-generated content resembles the badly made stockings of the nineteenth century. At the time of the Luddites, many hoped the subpar products would prove unacceptable to consumers or to the government. Instead, social norms adjusted.

Kyle Chayka # 27th September 2023, 12:26 am

Rethinking the Luddites in the Age of A.I. I’ve been staying way clear of comparisons to Luddites in conversations about the potential harmful impacts of modern AI tools, because it seemed to me like an offensive, unproductive cheap shot.

This article has shown me that the comparison is actually a lot more relevant—and sympathetic—than I had realized.

In a time before labor unions, the Luddites represented an early example of a worker movement that tried to stand up for their rights in the face of transformational, negative change to their specific way of life.

“Knitting machines known as lace frames allowed one employee to do the work of many without the skill set usually required” is a really striking parallel to what’s starting to happen with a surprising array of modern professions already. # 26th September 2023, 11:45 pm

We already know one major effect of AI on the skills distribution: AI acts as a skills leveler for a huge range of professional work. If you were in the bottom half of the skill distribution for writing, idea generation, analyses, or any of a number of other professional tasks, you will likely find that, with the help of AI, you have become quite good.

Ethan Mollick # 25th September 2023, 4:37 pm

A Hackers’ Guide to Language Models. Jeremy Howard’s new 1.5 hour YouTube introduction to language models looks like a really useful place to catch up if you’re an experienced Python programmer looking to start experimenting with LLMs. He covers what they are and how they work, then shows how to build against the OpenAI API, build a Code Interpreter clone using OpenAI functions, run models from Hugging Face on your own machine (with NVIDIA cards or on a Mac) and finishes with a demo of fine-tuning a Llama 2 model to perform text-to-SQL using an open dataset. # 25th September 2023, 12:24 am

LLM 0.11. I released LLM 0.11 with support for the new gpt-3.5-turbo-instruct completion model from OpenAI.

The most interesting feature of completion models is the option to request “log probabilities” from them, where each token returned is accompanied by up to 5 alternatives that were considered, along with their scores. # 19th September 2023, 3:28 pm

In the long term, I suspect that LLMs will have a significant positive impact on higher education. Specifically, I believe they will elevate the importance of the humanities. [...] LLMs are deeply, inherently textual. And they are reliant on text in a way that is directly linked to the skills and methods that we emphasize in university humanities classes.

Benjamin Breen # 13th September 2023, 3:40 am

Simulating History with ChatGPT (via) Absolutely fascinating new entry in the using-ChatGPT-to-teach genre. Benjamin Breen teaches history at UC Santa Cruz, and has been developing a sophisticated approach to using ChatGPT to play out role-playing scenarios involving different periods of history. His students are challenged to participate in them, then pick them apart—fact-checking details from the scenario and building critiques of the perspectives demonstrated by the language model. There are so many quotable snippets in here, I recommend reading the whole thing. # 13th September 2023, 3:36 am

Build an image search engine with llm-clip, chat with models with llm chat

LLM is my combination CLI tool and Python library for working with Large Language Models. I just released LLM 0.10 with two significant new features: embedding support for binary files and the llm chat command.

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The AI-assistant wars heat up with Claude Pro, a new ChatGPT Plus rival. I'm quoted in this piece about the new Claude Pro $20/month subscription from Anthropic:

Willison has also run into problems with Claude's morality filter, which has caused him trouble by accident: "I tried to use it against a transcription of a podcast episode, and it processed most of the text before—right in front of my eyes—it deleted everything it had done! I eventually figured out that they had started talking about bomb threats against data centers towards the end of the episode, and Claude effectively got triggered by that and deleted the entire transcript."

# 10th September 2023, 5:07 pm

promptfoo: How to benchmark Llama2 Uncensored vs. GPT-3.5 on your own inputs. promptfoo is a CLI and library for “evaluating LLM output quality”. This tutorial in their documentation about using it to compare Llama 2 to gpt-3.5-turbo is a good illustration of how it works: it uses YAML files to configure the prompts, and more YAML to define assertions such as “not-icontains: AI language model”. # 10th September 2023, 4:19 pm

Matthew Honnibal from spaCy on why LLMs have not solved NLP. A common trope these days is that the entire field of NLP has been effectively solved by Large Language Models. Here’s a lengthy comment from Matthew Honnibal, creator of the highly regarded spaCy Python NLP library, explaining in detail why that argument doesn’t hold up. # 9th September 2023, 9:30 pm

hubcap.php (via) This PHP script by Dave Hulbert delights me. It’s 24 lines of code that takes a specified goal, then calls my LLM utility on a loop to request the next shell command to execute in order to reach that goal... and pipes the output straight into exec() after a 3s wait so the user can panic and hit Ctrl+C if it’s about to do something dangerous! # 6th September 2023, 3:45 pm

Using ChatGPT Code Intepreter (aka “Advanced Data Analysis”) to analyze your ChatGPT history. I posted a short thread showing how to upload your ChatGPT history to ChatGPT itself, then prompt it with “Build a dataframe of the id, title, create_time properties from the conversations.json JSON array of objects. Convert create_time to a date and plot it daily”. # 6th September 2023, 3:42 pm

Perplexity: interactive LLM visualization (via) I linked to a video of Linus Lee’s GPT visualization tool the other day. Today he’s released a new version of it that people can actually play with: it runs entirely in a browser, powered by a 120MB version of the GPT-2 ONNX model loaded using the brilliant Transformers.js JavaScript library. # 6th September 2023, 3:33 am

Symbex 1.4. New release of my Symbex tool for finding symbols (functions, methods and classes) in a Python codebase. Symbex can now output matching symbols in JSON, CSV or TSV in addition to plain text.

I designed this feature for compatibility with the new “llm embed-multi” command—so you can now use Symbex to find every Python function in a nested directory and then pipe them to LLM to calculate embeddings for every one of them.

I tried it on my projects directory and embedded over 13,000 functions in just a few minutes! Next step is to figure out what kind of interesting things I can do with all of those embeddings. # 5th September 2023, 5:29 pm

A token-wise likelihood visualizer for GPT-2. Linus Lee built a superb visualization to help demonstrate how Large Language Models work, in the form of a video essay where each word is coloured to show how “surprising” it is to the model. It’s worth carefully reading the text in the video as each term is highlighted to get the full effect. # 5th September 2023, 3:39 am

LLM now provides tools for working with embeddings

LLM is my Python library and command-line tool for working with language models. I just released LLM 0.9 with a new set of features that extend LLM to provide tools for working with embeddings.

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A practical guide to deploying Large Language Models Cheap, Good *and* Fast. Joel Kang’s extremely comprehensive notes on what he learned trying to run Vicuna-13B-v1.5 on an affordable cloud GPU server (a T4 at $0.615/hour). The space is in so much flux right now—Joel ended up using MLC but the best option could change any minute.

Vicuna 13B quantized to 4-bit integers needed 7.5GB of the T4’s 16GB of VRAM, and returned tokens at 20/second.

An open challenge running MLC right now is around batching and concurrency: “I did try making 3 concurrent requests to the endpoint, and while they all stream tokens back and the server doesn’t OOM, the output of all 3 streams seem to actually belong to a single prompt.” # 4th September 2023, 1:43 pm

WebLLM supports Llama 2 70B now. The WebLLM project from MLC uses WebGPU to run large language models entirely in the browser. They recently added support for Llama 2, including Llama 2 70B, the largest and most powerful model in that family.

To my astonishment, this worked! I used a M2 Mac with 64GB of RAM and Chrome Canary and it downloaded many GBs of data... but it worked, and spat out tokens at a slow but respectable rate of 3.25 tokens/second. # 30th August 2023, 2:41 pm

Llama 2 is about as factually accurate as GPT-4 for summaries and is 30X cheaper. Anyscale offer (cheap, fast) API access to Llama 2, so they’re not an unbiased source of information—but I really hope their claim here that Llama 2 70B provides almost equivalent summarization quality to GPT-4 holds up. Summarization is one of my favourite applications of LLMs, partly because it’s key to being able to implement Retrieval Augmented Generation against your own documents—where snippets of relevant documents are fed to the model and used to answer a user’s question. Having a really high performance openly licensed summarization model is a very big deal. # 30th August 2023, 2:37 pm

Making Large Language Models work for you

I gave an invited keynote at WordCamp 2023 in National Harbor, Maryland on Friday.

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Would I forbid the teaching (if that is the word) of my stories to computers? Not even if I could. I might as well be King Canute, forbidding the tide to come in. Or a Luddite trying to stop industrial progress by hammering a steam loom to pieces.

Stephen King # 25th August 2023, 6:31 pm

airoboros LMoE. airoboros provides a system for fine-tuning Large Language Models. The latest release adds support for LMoE—LoRA Mixture of Experts. GPT-4 is strongly rumoured to work as a mixture of experts—several (maybe 8?) 220B models each with a different specialty working together to produce the best result. This is the first open source (Apache 2) implementation of that pattern that I’ve seen. # 24th August 2023, 10:31 pm

Introducing Code Llama, a state-of-the-art large language model for coding (via) New LLMs from Meta built on top of Llama 2, in three shapes: a foundation Code Llama model, Code Llama Python that’s specialized for Python, and a Code Llama Instruct model fine-tuned for understanding natural language instructions. # 24th August 2023, 5:54 pm

llm-tracker. Leonard Lin’s constantly updated encyclopedia of all things Large Language Model: lists of models, opinions on which ones are the most useful, details for running Speech-to-Text models, code assistants and much more. # 23rd August 2023, 4:11 am

When many business people talk about “AI” today, they treat it as a continuum with past capabilities of the CNN/RNN/GAN world. In reality it is a step function in new capabilities and products enabled, and marks the dawn of a new era of tech.

It is almost like cars existed, and someone invented an airplane and said “an airplane is just another kind of car—but with wings”—instead of mentioning all the new use cases and impact to travel, logistics, defense, and other areas. The era of aviation would have kicked off, not the “era of even faster cars”.

Elad Gil # 21st August 2023, 8:32 pm