Simon Willison’s Weblog

34 items tagged “generativeai”

2022

Stable Diffusion 2.0 and the Importance of Negative Prompts for Good Results. Stable Diffusion 2.0 is out, and it’s a very different model from 1.4/1.5. It’s trained using a new text encoder (OpenCLIP, in place of OpenAI’s CLIP) which means a lot of the old tricks—notably using “Greg Rutkowski” to get high quality fantasy art—no longer work. What DOES work, incredibly well, is negative prompting—saying things like “cyberpunk forest by Salvador Dali” but negative on “trees, green”. Max Woolf explores negative prompting in depth in this article, including how to combine it with textual inversion. # 29th November 2022, 1:22 am

“You are GPT-3”. Genius piece of prompt design by Riley Goodside. “A long-form GPT-3 prompt for assisted question-answering with accurate arithmetic, string operations, and Wikipedia lookup. Generated IPython commands (in green) are pasted into IPython and output is pasted back into the prompt (no green).” Uses “Out[” as a stop sequence to ensure GPT-3 stops at each generated iPython prompt rather than inventing the output itself. # 17th October 2022, 4:35 am

The AI that creates any picture you want, explained. Vox made this explainer video about text-to-image generative AI models back in June, months before Stable Diffusion was released and shortly before the DALL-E preview started rolling out to a wider audience. It’s a really good video—in particular the animation that explains at a high level how diffusion models work, which starts about 5m30s in. # 10th October 2022, 3:28 am

Is the AI spell-casting metaphor harmful or helpful?

For a few weeks now I’ve been promoting spell-casting as a metaphor for prompt design against generative AI systems such as GPT-3 and Stable Diffusion.

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Getting tabular data from unstructured text with GPT-3: an ongoing experiment (via) Roberto Rocha shows how to use a carefully designed prompt (with plenty of examples) to get GPT-3 to convert unstructured textual data into a structured table. # 5th October 2022, 3:03 am

The Illustrated Stable Diffusion (via) Jay Alammar provides a detailed, clearly explained description of how the Stable Diffusion image generation model actually works under the hood.. # 5th October 2022, 2:58 am

Exploring 10m scraped Shutterstock videos used to train Meta’s Make-A-Video text-to-video model

Make-A-Video is a new “state-of-the-art AI system that generates videos from text” from Meta AI. It looks incredible—it really is DALL-E / Stable Diffusion for video. And it appears to have been trained on 10m video preview clips scraped from Shutterstock.

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I Resurrected “Ugly Sonic” with Stable Diffusion Textual Inversion (via) “I trained an Ugly Sonic object concept on 5 image crops from the movie trailer, with 6,000 steps [...] (on a T4 GPU, this took about 1.5 hours and cost about $0.21 on a GCP Spot instance)” # 20th September 2022, 3:35 am

You can’t solve AI security problems with more AI

One of the most common proposed solutions to prompt injection attacks (where an AI language model backed system is subverted by a user injecting malicious input—“ignore previous instructions and do this instead”) is to apply more AI to the problem.

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The Changelog: Stable Diffusion breaks the internet. I’m on this week’s episode of The Changelog podcast, talking about Stable Diffusion, AI ethics and a little bit about prompt injection attacks too. # 17th September 2022, 2:14 am

Twitter pranksters derail GPT-3 bot with newly discovered “prompt injection” hack. I’m quoted in this Ars Technica article about prompt injection and the Remoteli.io Twitter bot. # 16th September 2022, 6:33 pm

I don’t know how to solve prompt injection

Some extended thoughts about prompt injection attacks against software built on top of AI language models such a GPT-3. This post started as a Twitter thread but I’m promoting it to a full blog entry here.

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Prompt injection attacks against GPT-3

Riley Goodside, yesterday:

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karpathy/minGPT (via) A “minimal PyTorch re-implementation” of the OpenAI GPT training and inference model, by Andrej Karpathy. It’s only a few hundred lines of code and includes extensive comments, plus notebook demos. # 6th September 2022, 2:52 pm

r/MachineLearning: What is the SOTA explanation for why deep learning works? The thing I find fascinating about this Reddit conversation is that it makes it clear that the machine learning research community has very little agreement on WHY the state of the art techniques that are being used today actually work as well as they do. # 5th September 2022, 5:46 pm

Exploring the training data behind Stable Diffusion

Two weeks ago, the Stable Diffusion image generation model was released to the public. I wrote about this last week, in Stable Diffusion is a really big deal—a post which has since become one of the top ten results for “stable diffusion” on Google and shown up in all sorts of different places online.

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Grokking Stable Diffusion (via) Jonathan Whitaker built this interactive Jupyter notebook that walks through how to use Stable Diffusion from Python step-by-step, and then dives deep into helping understand the different components of the implementation, including how text is encoded, how the diffusion loop works and more. This is by far the most useful tool I’ve seen yet for understanding how this model actually works. You can run Jonathan’s notebook directly on Google Colab, with a GPU. # 4th September 2022, 6:50 pm

Run Stable Diffusion on your M1 Mac’s GPU. Ben Firshman provides detailed instructions for getting Stable Diffusion running on an M1 Mac. # 1st September 2022, 5:41 pm

Exploring 12 Million of the 2.3 Billion Images Used to Train Stable Diffusion’s Image Generator. Andy Baio and I collaborated on an investigation into the training set used for Stable Diffusion. I built a Datasette instance with 12m image records sourced from the LAION-Aesthetics v2 6+ aesthetic score data used as part of the training process, and built a tool so people could run searches and explore the data. Andy did some extensive analysis of things like the domains scraped for the images and names of celebrities and artists represented in the data. His write-up here explains our project in detail and some of the patterns we’ve uncovered so far. # 31st August 2022, 2:10 am

Stable Diffusion is a really big deal

If you haven’t been paying attention to what’s going on with Stable Diffusion, you really should be.

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Stable Diffusion Public Release (via) New AI just dropped. Stable Diffusion is similar to DALL-E, but completely open source and with a CC0 license applied to everything it generates. I have a Twitter thread (the via) link of comparisons I’ve made between its output and my previous DALL-E experiments. The announcement buries the lede somewhat: to try it out, visit beta.dreamstudio.ai—which you can use for free at the moment, but it’s unclear to me how billing is supposed to work. # 22nd August 2022, 7:12 pm

Show HN: A new way to use GPT-3 to generate code (and everything else). Riley Goodside is my favourite Twitter follow for GPT-3 tips. Here he describes a powerful prompt pattern he’s designed which lets you generate extremely complex code output by asking GPT-3 to fill in $$areas like this$$ with different patterns, then stitch them together into full HTML or other source code files. It’s really clever. # 20th August 2022, 9:33 pm

Building games and apps entirely through natural language using OpenAI’s code-davinci model. A deeply sophisticated example of using prompts to generate entire working JavaScript programs and games using the new code-davinci OpenAI model. # 17th August 2022, 7:06 pm

How I Used DALL·E 2 to Generate The Logo for OctoSQL (via) Jacob Martin gives a blow-by-blow account of his attempts at creating a logo for his OctoSQL project using DALL-E, spending $30 of credits and making extensive use of both the “variations” feature and the tool that lets you request modifications to existing images by painting over parts you want to regenerate. Really interesting to read as an example of a “real world” DALL-E project. # 2nd August 2022, 9:12 pm

The DALL·E 2 Prompt Book (via) This is effectively DALL-E: The Missing Manual: an 81 page PDF book that goes into exhaustive detail about how to get the most out of DALL-E through creative prompt design. # 14th July 2022, 11:26 pm

GPT-3 prompt for spotting nonsense questions (via) In response to complaints that GPT-3 will happily provide realistic sounding answers to nonsense questions, rictic recommends the following prompt: “I’ll ask a series of questions. If the questions are nonsense, answer ”yo be real“, if they’re a question about something that actually happened, answer them.” # 10th July 2022, 4:33 am

Using GPT-3 to explain how code works

One of my favourite uses for the GPT-3 AI language model is generating explanations of how code works. It’s shockingly effective at this: its training set clearly include a vast amount of source code.

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First impressions of DALL-E, generating images from text

I made it off the DALL-E waiting list a few days ago and I’ve been having an enormous amount of fun experimenting with it. Here are some notes on what I’ve learned so far (and a bunch of example images too).

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How Imagen Actually Works. Imagen is Google’s new text-to-image model, similar to (but possibly even more effective than) DALL-E. This article is the clearest explanation I’ve seen of how Imagen works: it uses Google’s existing T5 text encoder to convert the input sentence into an encoding that captures the semantic meaning of the sentence (including things like items being described as being on top of other items), then uses a trained diffusion model to generate a 64x64 image. That image is passed through two super-res models to increase the resolution to the final 1024x1024 output. # 23rd June 2022, 6:05 pm

How to use the GPT-3 language model

I ran a Twitter poll the other day asking if people had tried GPT-3 and why or why not. The winning option, by quite a long way, was “No, I don’t know how to”. So here’s how to try it out, for free, without needing to write any code.

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