Simon Willison’s Weblog

24 items tagged “davewiner”

rev=canonical bookmarklet and designing shorter URLs

I’ve watched the proliferation of URL shortening services over the past year with a certain amount of dismay. I care about the health of the web and try to ensure that URLs I am responsible will last for as long as possible, and I think it’s very unlikely that all of these new services will still be around in twenty years time. Last month I suggested that the Internet Archive start mirroring redirect databases, and last week I was pleased to hear that Archiveteam, a different organisation, had already started crawling.

[... 920 words]

Dare left something out (and it’s important). Dave Winer: “You should at least learn the lessons and add to REST what it needs to catch up with XML-RPC. Seriously. What’s missing in REST, btw, is a standard method of serializing structs, lists and scalar types.” That would be JSON. # 18th August 2008, 9:39 am

Why JSON isn’t just for JavaScript

Dave Winer’s discovery of JSON (and shock that “it’s not even XML”) has triggered an interesting discussion thread, on his blog and elsewhere. Plenty of people have re-assured him (and themselves) that it’s only used for JavaScript—it’s convenient in the browser but irrelevant elsewhere.

[... 787 words]

I read on Niall Kennedy that del.icio.us has come up with an API that returns a JSON structure, and I figured, sheez it can’t be that hard to parse, so let’s see what it looks like, and damn, IT’S NOT EVEN XML! [...] Who did this travesty? Let’s find a tree and string them up. Now.

Dave Winer # 20th December 2006, 7:21 pm

The myth of RSS compatibility [dive into mark]. Sometimes I think Mark’s raison d etre is to upset Dave Winer # 4th February 2004, 7:45 pm

Sitting nervously on the fence

Today’s hot topic is the Winer Watcher, Mark Pilgrim’s new tool that tracks and highlights edits made to Dave Winer’s Scripting News. The blogosphere is pretty much evenly split on this: some people think it is a blatant attack on Dave Winer, tantamount o blogger bullying, while others see it as a neat technical solution to a very real problem.

[... 1146 words]

Google oddities

Dave Winer:

[... 182 words]

Scripting.com, with added CSS

One of the aims of this course is to show how relatively simple CSS can be used to make dramatic improvements to existing sites. Today, I’ll show how CSS can be used to reduce the amount of code needed for a small part of the design of Scripting.com.

[... 1178 words]

Tim Bray on RSS

Tim Bray: RSS Needs Fixing:

[... 255 words]

Wiki Wiki Blogroll

Dave Winer has launched an experimental “open” blogroll. It looks a bit too open to abuse for my liking (Wikis are protected to a certain extent by their revision historys) but the interface for changing the order of entries is one of the most elegant non-javascript solutions I’ve seen.

[... 58 words]

Flamin’ CSS

Dave Winer, in a follow up to his recent CSS problems:

[... 807 words]

The slashdot effect

Dave Winer asks why Joel Spolsky gets much more traffic when slashdotted than UserLand’s hosted sites tend to. Joel explains (it’s all down to network effects) and mpt kicks in a few ideas as well.

[... 57 words]

Weblogs table as an ordered list

Dave Winer:

[... 259 words]

You know me

Dave Winer: The “You Know Me” Button. Dave hates posting comments on blogs and then having to check back constantly to see if anyone has replied (I do too). Sam Ruby’s solution is to provide the comments as a separate RSS feed for each of his entries, but Dave wants something more automatic that won’t clog up his aggregator. Dave’s new proposal is intruiging to say the least. When you sign up for an account with a discussion forum you have the option of configuring a link to an “identity server” able to respond to a specific protocol. Once this has been done, the discussion software “pings” your identity server with your username and a message whenever someone responds to one of your posts.

[... 402 words]

A global conversation

Dave Winer on TrackBacks and push backs (and presumably PingBack as well):

[... 317 words]

Dave on tag soup

Dave Winer: What is Tag Soup?

[... 271 words]

Pingback coverage

The Pingback 1.0 specification is getting some serious attention. Mark Pilgrim and Dave Winer have linked to it. Ben Trott (co-author of Moveable Type and creator of TrackBack, the system that inspired Pingback) has objected to Hixie’s suggestion that Pingback is more transparent than TrackBack, claiming that TrackBack could be made just as transparent by the right blog tools. Ben blogged some further thoughts which lead to the following comment by Phil Ringnalda:

[... 278 words]

RSS2 modules

It seems RSS 2.0 has the capability to support modules (I was under the false impression that this ability was restricted to RDF modules in the rival RSS 1.0 specification). Following a post by Mark Pilgrim on B-linking (the blogging equivalent of a B-movie) Dave Winer has released a draft of blogChannel, the first ever RSS 2.0 module.

[... 68 words]

Arouse your PC

Dave Winer: Why be Semantic when you can be Romantic?

[... 140 words]

Wining and Dining

Kevin Burton: My Dinner with Dave Winer. Something tells me this won’t be linked from Scripting News.

[... 18 words]

Joel on platforms

Joel Spolsky: Platforms. Plenty of food for thought. Dave Winer responds with a pointer to his 1996 article The Perfect Parent which touches on the reasons Groove can’t count on making it as a platform.

[... 45 words]

The Lessig debate

I watched Laurence Lessig’s OSCON keynote the other day (an 8.4MB Flash file courtesy of Leonard Lin). A transcript of the session is also available. It was an excellent presentation and really opened my eyes to the issues facing intellectual property in the United States. It also appears to have raised some hackles—Dave Winer took offence to the implication that developers had not done anything about the problem, and Doc Searls has responded to Dave’s criticism with some interesting background information on Lessig.

[... 104 words]

The Two Way Web

Dave Winer: The Two Way Web. The Two-Way-Web is a vision for the Web as an easy writing and publishing environment. This is an old essay from March 2001 (I only found it today) which describes a vision of a web where content can be quickly and easily edited through a variety of tools, which communicate with content management systems using XML-RPC and SOAP. This is all stuff I’ve been thinking about recently, so it looks like I’m only a year and a half behind Dave ;)

[... 100 words]

Stupid Danish newspapers

More deep linking stupidity (via Scripting News). A judge in Denmark has ruled in favour of a newspaper who took a search engine to court over “deep linking”, despite the search engine’s spider following the robots.txt standard (it seems the newspaper didn’t bother to implement a robots.txt file). Dave Winer summed things up perfectly:

[... 86 words]