Simon Willison’s Weblog

5 items tagged “websocket”

2018

Being fast and light: Using binary data to optimise libraries on the client and the server. (via) Ada Rose Cannon provides a detailed introduction to ArrayBuffers in JavaScript and describes how she used them for a custom binary protocol to sync the state of 170 Virtual Reality users in the same venue without bringing down the network. # 13th March 2018, 2:34 pm

Domains Search for Web: Instant, Serverless & Global (via) The team at Zeit are pioneering a whole bunch of fascinating web engineering architectural patterns. Their new domain name autocomplete search uses Next.js and server-side rendering on first load, then switches to client-side rendering from then on. It can then load results asynchronously over a custom WebSocket protocol as the microservices on the backend finish resolving domain availability from the various different TLD providers. # 26th January 2018, 1:14 am

2010

Mongrel2 is “Self-Hosting”. Zed Shaw’s Mongrel2 is shaping up to be a really interesting project. “A web server simply written in C that loves all languages equally”, the two most interesting new ideas are the ability to handle HTTP, Flash Sockets and WebSockets all on the same port (thanks to an extension to the Mongrel HTTP parser that can identify all three protocols) and the ability to hook Mongrel2 up to the backend servers using either TCP/IP or ZeroMQ. I’m guessing this means Mongrel2 could hold an HTTP request open, fire off some messages and wait for various backends to send messages back to construct the response, making async processing just as easy as a regular blocking request/response cycle. # 17th June 2010, 8:11 pm

Realtime Election Tweets. Jay Caines-Gooby’s realtime election tweet service, using Node.js, nginx and WebSocket with a Flash fallback. # 6th May 2010, 9:20 pm

2008

Independence Day: HTML5 WebSocket Liberates Comet From Hacks. The HTML5 spec now includes WebSocket, a TCP-style persistent socket mechanism between client and server using an HTTP handshake to work around firewalls. The Orbited comet implementation provides a WebSocket compatible API to existing browsers today, and can also act as a firewall/proxy between WebSocket and regular TCP sockets, allowing browsers to talk to things like XMPP servers using Orbited to bridge the gap. # 4th July 2008, 9:54 am