Simon Willison’s Weblog

Blogmarks in 2021

Filters: Type: blogmark × Year: 2021 ×


How to secure an Ubuntu server using Tailscale and UFW. This is the Tailscale tutorial I’ve always wanted: it explains in detail how you can run an Ubuntu server (from any cloud provider) such that only devices on your personal Tailscale network can access it. # 26th February 2021, 8:31 pm

Fuzzy Name Matching in Postgres. Paul Ramsey describes how to implement fuzzy name matching in PostgreSQL using the fuzzystrmatch extension and its levenshtein() and soundex() functions, plus functional indexes to query against indexed soundex first and then apply slower Levenshtein. The same tricks should also work against SQLite using the datasette-jellyfish plugin. # 22nd February 2021, 9:16 pm

Blazing fast CI with pytest-split and GitHub Actions (via) pytest-split is a neat looking variant on the pattern of splitting up a test suite to run different parts of it in parallel on different machines. It involves maintaining a periodically updated JSON file in the repo recording the average runtime of different tests, to enable them to be more fairly divided among test runners. Includes a recipe for running as a matrix in GitHub Actions. # 22nd February 2021, 7:06 pm

People, processes, priorities. Twitter thread from Adrienne Porter Felt outlining her model for thinking about engineering management. I like this trifecta of “people, processes, priorities” a lot. # 22nd February 2021, 5:21 pm

trustme (via) This looks incredibly useful. Run “python -m trustme” and it will create three files for you: server.pem, server.key and a client.pem client certificate, providing a certificate for “localhost” (or another host you spefict) using a fake certificate authority. Looks like it should be the easiest way to test TLS locally. # 11th February 2021, 8 pm

Why I Built Litestream. Litestream is a really exciting new piece of technology by Ben Johnson, who previously built BoltDB, the key-value store written in Go that is used by etcd. It adds replication to SQLite by running a process that converts the SQLite WAL log into a stream that can be saved to another folder or pushed to S3. The S3 option is particularly exciting—Ben estimates that keeping a full point-in-time recovery log of a high write SQLite database should cost in the order of a few dollars a month. I think this could greatly expand the set of use-cases for which SQLite is sensible choice. # 11th February 2021, 7:25 pm

Dependency Confusion: How I Hacked Into Apple, Microsoft and Dozens of Other Companies (via) Alex Birsan describes a new category of security vulnerability he discovered in the npm, pip and gem packaging ecosystems: if a company uses a private repository with internal package names, uploading a package with the same name to the public repository can often result in an attacker being able to execute their own code inside the networks of their target. Alex scored over $130,000 in bug bounties from this one, from a number of name-brand companies. Of particular note for Python developers: the --extra-index-url argument to pip will consult both public and private registries and install the package with the highest version number! # 10th February 2021, 8:42 pm

Cleaning Up Your Postgres Database (via) Craig Kerstiens provides some invaluable tips on running an initial check of the health of a PostgreSQL database, by using queries against the pg_statio_user_indexes table to find the memory cache hit ratio and the pg_stat_user_tables table to see what percentage of queries to your tables are using an index. # 3rd February 2021, 7:32 am

JMeter Result Analysis using Datasette (via) NaveenKumar Namachivayam wrote a detailed tutorial on using Datasette (on Windows) and csvs-to-sqlite to analyze the results of JMeter performance test runs and then publish them online using Vercel. # 1st February 2021, 4:42 am

Making GitHub’s new homepage fast and performant. A couple of really clever tricks in this article by Tobias Ahlin. The first is using IntersectionObserver in conjunction with the video preload=“none” attribute to lazily load a video when it scrolls into view. The second is an ingenious trick to create an efficiently encoded transparent JPEG image: embed the image in a SVG file twice, once as the image and once as a transparency mask. # 29th January 2021, 7:05 pm

Culture is the Behavior You Reward and Punish (via) Jocelyn Goldfein describes an intriguing exercise for discovering your company culture: imagine a new hire asking for advice on what makes people successful there, and use that to review what behavior is rewarded and discouraged. # 12th January 2021, 6:09 am

datasette-css-properties (via) My new Datasette plugin defines a “.css” output format which returns the data from the query as a valid CSS stylesheet defining custom properties for each returned column. This means you can build a page using just HTML and CSS that consumes API data from Datasette, no JavaScript required! Whether this is a good idea or not is left as an exercise for the reader. # 7th January 2021, 7:42 pm

Custom Properties as State. Fascinating thought experiment by Chris Coyier: since CSS custom properties can be defined in an external stylesheet, we can APIs that return stylesheets defining dynamically server-side generated CSS values for things like time-of-day colour schemes or even strings that can be inserted using ::after { content: var(--my-property). This gave me a very eccentric idea for a Datasette plugin... # 7th January 2021, 7:39 pm

brumm.af/shadows (via) I did not know this trick: by defining multiple box-shadow values as a comma separated list you can create much more finely tuned shadow effects. This tool by Philipp Brumm provides a very smart UI for designing shadows. # 6th January 2021, 4:12 pm

DALL·E: Creating Images from Text (via) “DALL·E is a 12-billion parameter version of GPT-3 trained to generate images from text descriptions, using a dataset of text–image pairs.”. The examples in this paper are astonishing—“an illustration of a baby daikon radish in a tutu walking a dog” generates exactly that. # 5th January 2021, 8:31 pm

Everything You Always Wanted To Know About GitHub (But Were Afraid To Ask) (via) ClickHouse by Yandex is an open source column-oriented data warehouse, designed to run analytical queries against TBs of data. They’ve loaded the full GitHub Archive of events since 2011 into a public instance, which is a great way of both exploring GitHub activity and trying out ClickHouse. Here’s a query I just ran that shows number of watch events per year, for example: SELECT toYear(created_at) as yyyy, count() FROM github_events WHERE event_type = ’WatchEvent’ group by yyyy # 5th January 2021, 1:02 am

hooks-in-a-nutshell.js (via) Neat, heavily annotated implementation of React-style hooks in pure JavaScript, really useful for understanding how they work. # 4th January 2021, 6:36 pm

sqlite-utils 3.2 (via) As discussed in my weeknotes yesterday, this is the release of sqlite-utils that adds the new “cached table counts via triggers” mechanism. # 3rd January 2021, 9:25 pm