Simon Willison’s Weblog

Items tagged docker in 2020

Filters: Year: 2020 × docker ×


New for AWS Lambda – Container Image Support. “You can now package and deploy Lambda functions as container images of up to 10 GB in size”—can’t wait to try this out with Datasette. # 1st December 2020, 5:34 pm

Sandboxing and Workload Isolation (via) Fly.io run other people’s code in containers, so workload isolation is a Big Deal for them. This blog post goes deep into the history of isolation and the various different approaches you can take, and fills me with confidence that the team at Fly.io know their stuff. I got to the bottom and found it had been written by Thomas Ptacek, which didn’t surprise me in the slightest. # 30th July 2020, 10:19 pm

GitHub Actions: Manual triggers with workflow_dispatch (via) New GitHub Actions feature which fills a big gap in the offering: you can now create “workflow dispatch” events which provide a button for manually triggering an action—and you can specify extra UI form fields that can customize how that action runs. This turns Actions into an interactive automation engine for any code that can be wrapped in a Docker container. # 7th July 2020, 4:33 am

datasette-publish-fly (via) Fly is a neat new Docker hosting provider with a very tempting pricing model: Just $2.67/month for their smallest always-on instance, and they give each user $10/month in free credit. datasette-publish-fly is the first plugin I’ve written using the publish_subcommand plugin hook, which allows extra hosting providers to be added as publish targets. Install the plugin and you can run “datasette publish fly data.db” to deploy SQLite databases to your Fly account. # 19th March 2020, 3:40 am

Weeknotes: Datasette Cloud and zero downtime deployments

Yesterday’s piece on Deploying a data API using GitHub Actions and Cloud Run was originally intended to be my weeknotes, but ended up getting a bit too involved.

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How to do Zero Downtime Deployments of Docker Containers. I’m determined to get reliable zero-downtime deploys working for a new project, because I know from experience that even a few seconds of downtime during a deploy changes the project mentality from “deploy any time you want” to “don’t deploy too often”. I’m using Docker containers behind Traefik, which means new containers should have traffic automatically balanced to them by Traefik based on their labels. After much fiddling around the pattern described by this article worked best for me: it lets me start a new container, then stop the old one and have Traefik’s “retry” mechanism send any requests to the stopped container over to the new one instead. # 16th January 2020, 11:12 pm

Weeknotes: Improv at Stanford, planning Datasette Cloud

Last week was the first week of the quarter at Stanford—which is called “shopping week” here because students are expected to try different classes to see which ones they are going to stick with.

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