Simon Willison’s Weblog

Items tagged deployment in 2020

Filters: Year: 2020 × deployment ×


Running Datasette on DigitalOcean App Platform (via) I spent some time with DigitalOcean’s new App Platform today, which is a Heroku-style PaaS that starts at $5/month. It looks like it could be a really good fit for Datasette. Disk is ephemeral, but if you’re publishing read-only data that doesn’t matter since you can build the SQLite database as part of the deployment and bundle it up in the Docker/Kubernetes container. # 7th October 2020, 2:52 am

Zero Downtime Release: Disruption-free Load Balancing of a Multi-Billion User Website (via) I remain fascinated by techniques for zero downtime deployment—once you have it working it makes shipping changes to your software so much less stressful, which means you can iterate faster and generally be much more confident in shipping code. Facebook have invested vast amounts of effort into getting this right, and their new paper for the ACM SIGCOMM conference goes into detail about how it all works. # 5th August 2020, 3:27 am

Weeknotes: Datasette Cloud and zero downtime deployments

Yesterday’s piece on Deploying a data API using GitHub Actions and Cloud Run was originally intended to be my weeknotes, but ended up getting a bit too involved.

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How to do Zero Downtime Deployments of Docker Containers. I’m determined to get reliable zero-downtime deploys working for a new project, because I know from experience that even a few seconds of downtime during a deploy changes the project mentality from “deploy any time you want” to “don’t deploy too often”. I’m using Docker containers behind Traefik, which means new containers should have traffic automatically balanced to them by Traefik based on their labels. After much fiddling around the pattern described by this article worked best for me: it lets me start a new container, then stop the old one and have Traefik’s “retry” mechanism send any requests to the stopped container over to the new one instead. # 16th January 2020, 11:12 pm

How we use “ship small” to rapidly build new features at GitHub (via) Useful insight into how GitHub develop new features. They make aggressive use of feature flags, shipping a rough skeleton of a new feature to production as early as possible and actively soliciting feedback from other employees as they iterate on the feature. They static JSON mocks of APIs to unblock their frontend engineers and iterate on the necessary data structures while the real backend is bring implemented. # 2nd January 2020, 4:30 am