Simon Willison’s Weblog

Items tagged python in 2019

Filters: Year: 2019 × python ×


Datasette 0.31. Released today: this version adds compatibility with Python 3.8 and breaks compatibility with Python 3.5. Since Glitch support Python 3.7.3 now I decided I could finally give up on 3.5. This means Datasette can use f-strings now, but more importantly it opens up the opportunity to start taking advantage of Starlette, which makes all kinds of interesting new ASGI-based plugins much easier to build. # 12th November 2019, 6:11 am

My Python Development Environment, 2020 Edition (via) Jacob Kaplan-Moss shares what works for him as a Python environment coming into 2020: pyenv, poetry, and pipx. I’m not a frequent user of any of those tools—it definitely looks like I should be. # 12th November 2019, 1:30 am

Automate the Boring Stuff with Python: Working with PDF and Word Documents. I stumbled across this while trying to extract some data from a PDF file (the kind of file with actual text in it as opposed to dodgy scanned images) and it worked perfectly: PyPDF2.PdfFileReader(open(“file.pdf”, “rb”)).getPage(0).extractText() # 6th November 2019, 4:17 pm

Why you should use `python -m pip` (via) Brett Cannon explains why he prefers “python -m pip install...” to “pip install...”—it ensures you always know exactly which Python interpreter environment you are installing packages for. He also makes the case for always installing into a virtual environment, created using “python -m venv”. # 2nd November 2019, 4:41 pm

Streamlit: Turn Python Scripts into Beautiful ML Tools (via) A really interesting new tool / application development framework. Streamlit is designed to help machine learning engineers build usable web frontends for their work. It does this by providing a simple, productive Python environment which lets you declaratively build up a sort-of Notebook style interface for your code. It includes the ability to insert a DataFrame, geospatial map rendering, chart or image into the application with a single Python function call. It’s hard to describe how it works, but the tutorial and demo worked really well for me: “pip install streamlit” and then “streamlit hello” to get a full-featured demo in a browser, then you can run through the tutorial to start building a real interactive application in a few dozen lines of code. # 6th October 2019, 3:52 am

PyPI now supports uploading via API token (via) All of my open source Python libraries are set up to automatically deploy new tagged releases as PyPI packages using Circle CI or Travis, but I’ve always get a bit uncomfortable about sharing my PyPI password with those CI platforms to get this to work. PyPI just added scopes authentication tokens, which means I can issue a token that’s only allowed to upload a specific project and see an audit log of when that token was last used. # 1st August 2019, 4:03 pm

Using memory-profiler to debug excessive memory usage in healthkit-to-sqlite. This morning I figured out how to use the memory-profiler module (and mprof command line tool) to debug memory usage of Python processes. I added the details, including screenshots, to this GitHub issue. It helped me knock down RAM usage for my healthkit-to-sqlite from 2.5GB to just 80MB by making smarter usage of the ElementTree pull parser. # 24th July 2019, 8:25 am

PugSQL. Interesting new twist on a definitely-not-an-ORM library for Python. With PugSQL you define SQL queries in files, give them names and then load them into a module which allows you to execute them as Python methods with keyword arguments. You can mark statements as only returning a single row (or a single scalar value) with a comment at the top of their file. # 3rd July 2019, 6:19 pm

json-flatten. A little Python library I wrote that attempts to flatten a JSON object into a set of key/value pairs suitable for transmitting in a query string or using to construct an HTML form. I first wrote this back in 2015 as a Gist—I’ve reconstructed the Gist commit history in a new repository and shipped it to PyPI. # 22nd June 2019, 4:51 am

Toward a “Kernel Python” (via) Glyph makes a strong case for releasing a slimmed down “kernel” version of Python with the minimal possible standard library, and argues that the current standard library is proving impossible for a single core team to productively maintain. “If I wanted to update the colorsys module to be more modern—perhaps to have a Color object rather than a collection of free functions, perhaps to support integer color models—I’d likely have to wait 500 days, or more, for a review.” # 15th June 2019, 4 pm

quicktype code generator for Python. Really interesting tool: give it an example JSON document and it will code-generate the equivalent set of Python classes (with type annotations) instantly in your browser. It also accepts input in JSON Schema or TypeScript and can generate code in 18 different languages. # 14th May 2019, 11:35 pm

Smaller Python Docker Containers with Multi-Stage Builds and Python Wheels (via) Clear tutorial on how to use Docker’s multi-stage build feature to create smaller final images by taking advantage of Python’s wheel format—so an initial stage can install a full compiler toolchain and compile C dependencies into wheels, then a later stage can install those pre-compiled wheels into a slimmer container without including the C compiler. # 26th April 2019, 2:05 pm

An Intro to Threading in Python (via) Real Python consistently produces really comprehensive, high quality articles and tutorials. This is an excellent introduction to threading in Python, covering threads, locks, queues, ThreadPoolExecutor and more. # 18th April 2019, 5:24 am

Pyodide: Bringing the scientific Python stack to the browser (via) More fun with WebAssembly: Pyodide attempts (and mostly succeeds) to bring the full Python data stack to the browser: CPython, NumPy, Pandas, Scipy, and Matplotlib. Also includes interesting bridge tools for e.g. driving a canvas element from Python. Really interesting project from the Firefox Data Platform team. # 17th April 2019, 4:23 am

Wasmer: a Python library for executing WebAssembly binaries. This is a really interesting new tool: “pip install wasmer” and now you can load code that has been compiled to WebAssembly and call those functions directly from Python. It’s built on top of the wasmer universal WebAssembly runtime, written over just the past year in Rust by a team lead by Syrus Akbary, the author of the Graphene GraphQL library for Python. # 16th April 2019, 6:04 pm

Ministry of Silly Runtimes: Vintage Python on Cloud Run (via) Cloud Run is an exciting new hosting service from Google that lets you define a container using a Dockerfile and then run that container in a “scale to zero” environment, so you only pay for time spent serving traffic. It’s similar to the now-deprecated Zeit Now 1.0 which inspired me to create Datasette. Here Dustin Ingram demonstrates how powerful Docker can be as the underlying abstraction by deploying a web app using a 25 year old version of Python 1.x. # 9th April 2019, 5:33 pm

Generator Tricks for Systems Programmers (via) David Beazley’s definitive generators tutorial from 2008, updated for Python 3.7 in October 2018. # 9th April 2019, 5:13 pm

VisiData (via) Intriguing tool by Saul Pwanson: VisiData is a command-line “textpunk utility” for browsing and manipulating tabular data. “pip3 install visidata” and then “vd myfile.csv” (or .json or .xls or SQLite orothers) and get an interactive terminal UI for quickly searching through the data, conducting frequency analysis of columns, manipulating it and much more besides. Two tips for if you start playing with it: hit “gq” to exit, and hit “Ctrl+H” to view the help screen. # 18th March 2019, 3:45 am

huey. Charles Leifer’s “little task queue for Python”. Similar to Celery, but it’s designed to work with Redis, SQLite or in the parent process using background greenlets. Worth checking out for the really neat design. The project is new to me, but it’s been under active development since 2011 and has a very healthy looking rate of releases. # 25th February 2019, 7:49 pm

parameterized. I love the @parametrize decorator in pytest, which lets you run the same test multiple times against multiple parameters. The only catch is that the decorator in pytest doesn’t work for old-style unittest TestCase tests, which means you can’t easily add it to test suites that were built using the older model. I just found out about parameterized which works with unittest tests whether or not you are running them using the pytest test runner. # 19th February 2019, 9:05 pm

Launching LiteCLI (via) Really neat alternative command-line client for SQLite, written in Python and using the same underlying framework as the similar pgcli (PostgreSQL) and mycli (MySQL) tools. Provides really intuitive autocomplete against table names, columns and other bits and pieces of SQLite syntax. Installation is as easy as “pip install litecli”. # 5th January 2019, 11:16 pm