Simon Willison’s Weblog

Items in 2019

Filters: Year: 2019 ×


[On 5G] This is the great thing about the decentralized, permissionless innovation of the internet—telcos don’t need to decide in advance what the use cases are, any more than Intel had to decide what the use cases for faster CPUs would be.

Ben Evans # 18th January 2019, 6:55 am

SQLite in 2018: A state of the art SQL dialect (via) In 2018 SQLite gained boolean literals, window functions, filter clauses, upserts and the ability to rename a column. If you want to try it out the latest official datasetteproject/datasette Docker image now bundles SQLite 3.26. # 15th January 2019, 4:21 pm

An Interactive Introduction to Fourier Transforms (via) I love interactive exploitable explanations and this is the best I’ve seen in a while: Jez Swanson breaks down exactly what a Fourier transform does, first by letting you interactively draw and deconstruct wave patterns and then by showing Epicycles andcexplsining JPEG compression. All with not a formula in sight! # 12th January 2019, 2:55 am

Usable Data (via) A Paul Ford essay from February 2016 in which he advocates for SQLite as the ideal format for sharing interesting data. I don’t know how I missed this one—it predates Datasette, but it perfectly captures the benefits that I’m trying to expose with the project. “In my dream universe, there would be a massive searchable torrent site filled with open, explorable data sets, in SQLite format, some with full text search indexes already in place.” # 11th January 2019, 6:33 pm

Exploring search relevance algorithms with SQLite

SQLite isn’t just a fast, high quality embedded database: it also incorporates a powerful full-text search engine in the form of the FTS4 and FTS5 extensions. You’ve probably used these a bunch of times already: many iOS, Android and desktop applications use SQLite under-the-hood and use it to implement their built-in search.

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Launching LiteCLI (via) Really neat alternative command-line client for SQLite, written in Python and using the same underlying framework as the similar pgcli (PostgreSQL) and mycli (MySQL) tools. Provides really intuitive autocomplete against table names, columns and other bits and pieces of SQLite syntax. Installation is as easy as “pip install litecli”. # 5th January 2019, 11:16 pm