Simon Willison’s Weblog

Items tagged xss, security in 2007

Filters: Year: 2007 × xss × security ×


Why the h can’t Rails escape HTML automatically? It would be a pretty huge change, but auto-escaping in Rails 2.0 could close up a lot of accidental XSS holes. # 1st December 2007, 8:34 pm

Django Changeset 6671. Malcolm Tredinnick: “Implemented auto-escaping of variable output in templates”. Fantastic—Django now has protection against accidental XSS holes, turned on by default. # 14th November 2007, 5:05 pm

Site-specific browsers and GreaseKit. New site-specific browser tool which lets you include a bunch of Greasemonkey scripts. For me, the killer feature of site-specific browsers is still cookie isolation (to minimise the impact of XSS and CSRF holes) but none of the current batch of tools advertise this as a feature, and most seem to want to share the system-wide cookie jar. # 25th October 2007, 7:56 am

Two months with Ruby on Rails. Good rant—covers both the good and the bad. The first complaint is the lack of XSS protection by default in the template language. Django has the same problem, but the solution was 90% there when I saw Malcolm at OSCON. # 9th October 2007, 12:23 pm

Designing for a security breach

User account breaches are inevitable. We should take that in to account when designing our applications.

[... 545 words]

Top XSS exploits by PageRank. Yahoo!, MSN, Google, YouTube, MySpace, FaceBook all feature. # 29th May 2007, 10:07 pm

XSSed. Cross-site scripting resource and vulnerabilities archive, including reported (unpatched) holes ordered by PageRank. # 29th May 2007, 10:03 pm

Most HTML templating languages are written incorrectly. “If you ever find yourself in the position of designing an html template language, please make the default behavior when including variables be to HTML-escape them.” I couldn’t agree more. # 15th April 2007, 8:28 pm

XSS. Sanitising HTML is an extremely hard problem. The sanitize helper that ships with Rails is completely broken; Jacques Distler provides a better alternative. # 12th March 2007, 12:34 am

Security; AJAX; JSON; Satisfaction. The JSON attack I linked to earlier only works against raw arrays, which technically aren’t valid JSON anyway. # 6th March 2007, 8:06 am

PHP 4 phpinfo() XSS Vulnerability. Another reason not to run an open phpinfo() page on your server. # 4th March 2007, 9:24 pm

MySpace: Too Much of a Good Thing? CSS customization really was just the result of forgetting to strip HTML. They “eventually” decided to filter out JavaScript(!) # 17th January 2007, 9:09 am

Details of Google’s Latest Security Hole. For a brief while you could use Blogger Custom Domains to point a Google subdomain at your own content, letting you hijack Google cookies and steal accounts for any Google services. # 14th January 2007, 1:36 pm

The Adobe PDF XSS Vulnerability. If you host a PDF file anywhere on your site, you’re vulnerable to an XSS attack due to a bug in Acrobat Reader versions below 8. The fix is to serve PDFs as application/octet-stream to avoid them being displayed inline. # 11th January 2007, 4:23 pm

If you are subject to an XSS, the same domain policy already ensures that you’re f’d. An XSS attack is the “root” or “ring 0” attack of the web.

Alex Russell # 8th January 2007, 10:48 pm