Simon Willison’s Weblog

Items tagged timbray in 2007

Filters: Year: 2007 × timbray ×


Thai personal names (via) “Family names were allocated to families systematically and the use of family names is still controlled by the government. Any two people in Thailand with the same family name are related.” # 8th December 2007, 4:26 pm

WS-dämmerung. Tim Bray collects the latest round of WS-* repenting, which saves me from linking to them individually. # 22nd November 2007, 9:49 am

Some Notes on Tim Bray’s Wide Finder Benchmark. Fredrik Lundh demonstrates some Python ninja techniques for parsing log files using multiple cores (and eventually memory mapping). # 7th October 2007, 1:06 am

The Rubinius Sprint. Sun are throwing a ton of resources at Ruby, because as Tim Bray says, “it’s not fast enough”. Imagine where they’d be if they’d invested this kind of support in Jython five years ago... # 21st September 2007, 11:32 pm

There are only two hard things in Computer Science: cache invalidation and naming things

Phil Karlton # 5th July 2007, 12:46 am

If you write a spec, write a validator alongside. How much pain could have been spared with early versions of RSS if we’d had a common, agreed upon validator. In short, it’s the test suite that ultimately decides the spec.

Joe Heck # 30th May 2007, 1:48 am

Ten Reasons The World Needs Patent Covenants (via) Sun just made their OpenID patent covenant official. Simon Phipps explains why these are a Good Idea. # 22nd May 2007, 5:09 pm

People don’t recognize how important URIs are. The notion that you have a huge, world-scale, information space, and that everything in it has an name and they’re all just short strings that you can paint on the side of a bus; that’s a new thing and a good thing.

Tim Bray # 2nd May 2007, 8:23 pm

In the big picture, Twitter did exactly the right thing. They had a good idea and they buckled down and focused on delivering something as cool as possible as fast as possible, and it’s really hard, in early 2007, to beat Rails for that. When all of a sudden there were a few tens of thousands of people using it, then they went to work on the scaling.

Tim Bray # 14th April 2007, 9:13 am