Simon Willison’s Weblog

Blogmarks in Apr

Filters: Type: blogmark × Month: Apr ×


JSON Escape Text. I built a tiny tool for turning text into an escaped JSON string—I needed it to help create descriptions and canned SQL queries for adding to Datasette’s metadata.json files. # 25th April 2018, 4:13 am

dateparser: python parser for human readable dates (via) I’ve used dateutil.parser for this in the past, but dateparser is a major upgrade: it knows how to parse dates in 200 different language locales, can interpret different timezone representations and handles relative dates (“3 months, 1 week and 1 day ago”) as well. # 24th April 2018, 4:17 pm

csvs-to-sqlite 0.8. I released a new version of my csvs-to-sqlite tool this morning with a bunch of handy new features. It can now rename columns and define their types, add the CSV filenames as an additional column, add create indexes on columns and parse dates and datetimes into SQLite-friendly ISO formatted values. # 24th April 2018, 4:11 pm

react-jsonschema-form. Exciting library from the Mozilla Services team: given a JSON Schema definition, react-jsonschema-form can produce a cleanly designed React-powered form for adding and editing data that matches that schema. Includes support for adding multiple items in a nested array, re-ordering them, custom form widgets and more. # 23rd April 2018, 9:38 pm

Why it took a long time to build that tiny link preview on Wikipedia (via) Wikipedia now shows a little preview card on internal links with an image and summary paragraph of the linked page. As a Wikpedia user I absolutely love this feature—and as an engineer and product designer, it’s fascinating to hear the challenges they overcame to ship it. Of particular interest: actually generating a useful summary of a page, while stripping out the cruft that often accumulates at the beginning of their text. It’s also an impressive scaling challenge: the API they use for this feature is now handling more than 500,000 requests per minute. # 23rd April 2018, 9:07 pm

Datasette ClusterMap Plugin – Querying UK Food Standards Agency (FSA) Food Hygiene Ratings Open Data (via) Tony Hirst wrote a tutorial on using datasette-cluster-map to analyze food hygiene ratings data from the FSA # 20th April 2018, 8:50 pm

I submitted a PWA to 3 app stores. Here’s what I learned (via) Useful real-world experience shipping a progressive web app to the iOS, Android and Windows app stores. # 19th April 2018, 9:06 pm

How to rewrite your SQL queries in Pandas, and more (via) I still haven’t fully internalized the idioms needed to manipulate DataFrames in pandas. This tutorial helps a great deal—it shows the Pandas equivalents for a host of common SQL queries. # 19th April 2018, 6:34 pm

Intro to Threads and Processes in Python (via) I really like the diagrams in this article which compares the performance of Python threads and processes for different types of task via the excellent concurrent.futures library. # 19th April 2018, 6:32 pm

How to Use Static Type Checking in Python 3.6 (via) Useful introduction to optional static typing in Python 3.6, including how to use mypy, PyCharm and the Atom mypy plugin. # 19th April 2018, 6:30 pm

The best of Python: a collection of my favorite articles from 2017 and 2018 (so far). Gergely Szerovay has brought together an outstandingly interesting selection of Python articles from the last couple of years of activity of the Python community on Medium. A whole load of gems in here that I hadn’t seen before. # 19th April 2018, 6:28 pm

Creating Simple Interactive Forms Using Python + Markdown Using ScriptedForms + Jupyter (via) ScriptedForms is a fascinating Jupyter hack that lets you construct dynamic documents defined using markdown that provide form fields and evaluate Python code instantly as you interact with them. # 19th April 2018, 4:05 pm

What’s New in MySQL 8.0. MySQL 8 has lots of exciting improvements: Window functions, SRS aware spatial types for GIS, utf8mb4 by default, a ton of JSON improvements and atomic DDL. I no longer feel at a significant disadvantage when I have to use MySQL in place of PostgreSQL. # 19th April 2018, 4:03 pm

Text Embedding Models Contain Bias. Here’s Why That Matters (via) Excellent discussion from the Google AI team of the enormous challenge of building machine learning models without accidentally encoding harmful bias in a way that cannot be easily detected. # 17th April 2018, 8:54 pm

Datasette 0.19: Plugins Documentation (via) I’ve released the first preview of Datasette’s new plugin support, which uses the pluggy package originally developed for py.test. So far the only two plugin hooks are for SQLite connection creation (allowing custom SQL functions to be registered) and Jinja2 template environment initialization (for custom template tags), but this release is mainly about exercising the plugin registration mechanism and starting to gather feedback. Lots more to come. # 17th April 2018, 3:59 am

Datasette 0.18: units (via) This release features the first Datasette feature that was entirely designed and implemented by someone else (yay open source)—Russ Garrett wanted unit support (Hz, ft etc) for his Wireless Telegraphy Register project. It’s a really neat implementation: you can tell Datasette what units are in use for a particular database column and it will display the correct SI symbols on the page. Specifying units also enables unit-aware filtering: if Datasette knows that a column is measured in meters you can now query it for all rows that are less than 50 feet for example. # 14th April 2018, 3:56 pm

What do you mean “average”? (via) Lovely example of an interactive explorable demonstrating mode/mean/median, built as an Observable notebook using D3. # 12th April 2018, 4:41 pm

Wireless Telegraphy Register (via) Russ Garrett used Datasette to build a browsable interface to the UK’s register of business radio licenses, using data from Ofcom. # 12th April 2018, 4:08 pm

Mozilla Telemetry: In-depth Data Pipeline (via) Detailed behind-the-scenes look at an extremely sophisticated big data telemetry processing system built using open source tools. Some of this is unsurprising (S3 for storage, Spark and Kafka for streams) but the details are fascinating. They use a custom nginx module for the ingestion endpoint and have a “tee” server written in Lua and OpenResty which lets them route some traffic to alternative backend. # 12th April 2018, 3:44 pm

The Academic Vanity Honeypot phishing scheme. Twitter thread describing a nasty phishing attack where an academic receives an email from a respected peer congratulating them on a recent article and suggesting further reading. The further reading link is a phishing site that emulates the victim’s institution’s login page. # 12th April 2018, 3:07 pm

Visualizing disk IO activity using log-scale banded graphs (via) This is a neat data visualization trick: to display rates of disk I/O, it splits the rate into a GB, MB and KB section on a stacked chart. This means that if you are getting jitter in the order of KBs even while running at 400+MB/second you can see the jitter in the KB section. # 11th April 2018, 5:04 pm

GitHub for Nonprofits (via) TIL GitHub provide legally recognized nonprofits with free organization accounts with unlimited users and unlimited private repos—and they’ve registered 30,000 nonprofit accounts through the program as of May 2017. # 10th April 2018, 9:55 pm

Deckset for Mac (via) $29 desktop Mac application that creates presentations using a cleverly designed markdown dialect. You edit the underlying markdown in your standard text editor and the Deskset app shows a preview of the presentation and lets you hit “play” to run it or export it as a PDF. # 10th April 2018, 9:34 pm

elasticsearch-dump. Neat open source utility by TaskRabbit for importing and exporting data in bulk from Elasticsearch. It can copy data from one Elasticsearch cluster directly to another or to an intermediary file, making it a swiss-army knife for migrating data around. I successfully used the “docker run” incantation to execute it without needing to worry about having the correct version of Node.js installed. # 9th April 2018, 10:10 pm

Datasette 0.15: sort by column (via) I’ve released the latest version of Datasette to PyPI. The key new feature is the ability to sort tables by column, using clickable column headers or directly via the new _sort= and _sort_desc= querystring parameters. # 9th April 2018, 5:25 pm

awesome-falsehood: Curated list of falsehoods programmers believe in (via) I really like the general category of “falsehoods programmers believe”, and Kevin Deldyckehas done an outstanding job curating this collection. Categories covered include date and time, email, human identity, geography, addresses, internationalization and more. This is a particularly good example of the “awesome lists” format in that each link is accompanied by a useful description. # 8th April 2018, 7:57 pm

Cookies-over-HTTP Bad (via) Mike West from the Chrome security team proposes a way for browsers to start discouraging the use of tracking cookies sent over HTTP—which represent a significant threat to user privacy from network attackers. It’s a clever piece of thinking: browsers would slowly ramp up the forced expiry deadline for non-HTTPS cookies, further encouraging sites to switch to HTTPS cookies while giving them ample time to adapt. # 7th April 2018, 2:39 pm

Typesense (via) A new (to me) open source search engine, with a focus on being “typo-tolerant” and offering great, fast autocomplete—incredibly important now that most searches take place using a mobile phone keyboard. Similar to Elasticsearch or Solr in that it runs as an HTTP server that you serve JSON via POST and GET—and it offers read-only replicas for scaling and high availability. And since it’s 2018, if you have Docker running (I use Docker for Mac) you can start up a test instance with a one-line shell command. # 6th April 2018, 5:07 pm

Parsing CSV using ANTLR and Python 3. I’ve been trying to figure out how to use ANTLR grammars from Python—this is the first example I’ve found that really clicked for me. # 6th April 2018, 2:33 pm

gron. Ingenious tool for working with JSON on the command line: run “gron URL/filepath” to transform a JSON document into a multi-line assignment structure designed to be easy to run grep against. Grep it, then pipe it back into “gron --ungron” to convert the filtered data back to JSON again. It solves a similar problem to jq—which is addressed in the README: “gron’s primary purpose is to make it easy to find the path to a value in a deeply nested JSON blob when you don’t already know the structure; much of jq’s power is unlocked only once you know that structure”. # 3rd April 2018, 9:16 pm