Simon Willison’s Weblog

Blogmarks tagged security in 2008

Filters: Type: blogmark × Year: 2008 × security ×


Tip: Configure SAX parsers for secure processing. Explains the billion laughs attack, among others. # 23rd August 2008, 11:12 am

DoS vulnerability in REXML. Ruby’s REXML library is susceptible to the “billion laughs” denial of service attack where recursively nested entities expand a single entitity reference to a billion characters (kind of like the exploding zip file attack). Rails applications that process user-supplied XML should apply the monkey-patch ASAP; a proper gem update is forthcoming. # 23rd August 2008, 11:11 am

Reviews of the Pownce app on the iPhone app store on Flickr. I had to stitch together a screenshot because you can’t actually link to content in the App Store (unless you don’t care that people without iTunes won’t be able to follow your link). Three out of the four reviews complain about the OAuth browser authentication step, which is frustrating because Pownce have implemented it so well. # 12th August 2008, 11:05 am

Exposure (iPhone app) behaves suspiciously. Exposure on the iPhone does OAuth-style authentication incorrectly—it asks the user to authenticate in an embedded, chromeless browser which provides no way of confirming that the site being interacted with is not a phishing attack. Ben Ward explains how the Pownce iPhone app gets it right in the comments. Exposure author Fraser Spiers also responds. # 12th August 2008, 7:47 am

Facebook Security Advice: Never Ever Enter Your Passwords On Another Site, Unless We Ask You To. Nice to see TechCrunch highlighting the hypocrisy of Facebook advising their users to never enter their Facebook credentials on another site, then asking them for their webmail provider password so they can scrape their address book. # 9th August 2008, 10:18 am

Changeset 8162. “Implemented a secure password reset form that uses a token and prompts user for new password”—also sneaks base36 encoding and decoding in to Django. # 31st July 2008, 10:54 pm

The Truth about Web Navigation. Jeremy Zawodny on regular users understanding the browser address bar: “They don’t. And they never will.” Then they’re going to get phished, and there’s absolutely nothing we can do to help them. # 19th July 2008, 11:42 pm

Apple just gave out my Apple ID password because someone asked. “am forget my password of mac,did you give me password on new email marko.[redacted] @yahoo.com”. Classy. # 8th July 2008, 10:10 am

quipt (via) Extremely clever idea: Cache JavaScript in window.name (which persists between page views and can hold several MB of data), but use document.referrer to check that an external domain hasn’t loaded the cache with malicious code for an XSS attack. UPDATE: Jesse Ruderman points out a fatal flaw in the comments. # 4th July 2008, 3:49 pm

ratproxy. “A semi-automated, largely passive web application security audit tool”—watches you browse and highlights potential XSS, CSRF and other vulnerabilities in your application. Created by Michal Zalewski at Google. # 3rd July 2008, 2:35 pm

IE8 Security Part IV: The XSS Filter (via) IE8 will include an XSS filter to identify and neutralise “reflected” XSS attacks (where malicious code in a query string is rendered to the page), turned on by default. Sounds like a good idea to me, and site authors can disable it using Yet Another Custom HTTP header (X-XSS-Protection: 0). # 3rd July 2008, 9:37 am

eval() Kerfuffle. The ability to read supposedly private variables in Firefox using a second argument to eval() will be removed in Firefox 3.1. # 2nd July 2008, 9:24 pm

Ruby’s Vulnerability Handling Debacle. The critical Ruby vulnerabilities are over a week old now but there’s still no good official patch (the security patches cause segfaults in Rails, leaving the community reliant on unofficial patches from third parties). Max Caceres has three takeaway lessons, the most important of which is to always keep a “last-known-good” branch to apply critical patches to. # 2nd July 2008, 10:39 am

Poking new holes with Flash Crossdomain Policy File. This is an old article from 2006 which describes the crossdomain.xml hidden in a GIF exploit I referred to in an earlier post (scroll down to the appendix for an example). As far as I know the Flash Player’s crossdomain.xml parser has been tightened up since. # 1st July 2008, 4:12 pm

Evil GIFs: Partial Same Origin Bypass with Hybrid Files. First there were PNGs that had crossdomain.xml files embedded in them, now there are GIFs that contain Java applets (as JAR files). At this point I’d say don’t even bother trying to validate uploaded files, just make sure they’re served off an entirely different domain instead where XSS doesn’t matter. # 1st July 2008, 8:58 am

Javascript protocol fuzz results. If your HTML sanitizer uses blacklisting rather than whitelisting here are a few more weird ways of injecting javascript: in to a link that you need to worry about—but you should really switch to whitelisting http:// and https:// instead. # 30th June 2008, 3:57 pm

BUG: XSS Security flaw in BaseCamp Messages (via) BaseCamp lets users include HTML and JavaScript in messages, on the basis that anyone with a BaseCamp account is a trusted party. I’m not convinced: you could use this to circumvent BaseCamp’s access control stuff and read messages you’re not meant to. On the flip side, you could also use this to add brand new features to BaseCamp by using JavaScript in a message as a server-side equivalent to Greasemonkey. # 26th June 2008, 9:39 am

mod_rpaf for Apache. A more secure alternative to Django’s equivalent middleware: sets the REMOTE_ADDR of incoming requests from whitelisted load balancers to the X-Forwarded-For header, without any risk that if the load balancers are missing attackers could abuse it to spoof their IP addresses. # 24th June 2008, 5:02 pm

Arbitrary code execution vulnerabilities in Ruby (via) Sounds nasty—integer overflows and unsafe allocs leading to memory corruption. Definite DoS and possible code injection as well. Upgrade to Ruby “1.8.5-p231, or 1.8.6-p230, or 1.8.7-p22” ASAP. # 21st June 2008, 8:44 am

the tls report (via) Clever service that analyses a web server’s SSL implementation and grades it based on things like the protocols, certificates, ciphers and key lengths it supports. Includes public reports on the top and bottom 20 sites. # 10th June 2008, 11:49 pm

Yahoo! Address Book API Delivered. At last, now there’s no excuse to ask your users for their Yahoo! username and password just so you can scrape their address book. # 4th June 2008, 6:03 pm

Scaring people with fullScreen. Unsurprisingly, you can work around the “Press Esc to exit full screen mode” message in Flash by distracting the user with lots of similar looking visual noise. This opens up opportunities for cunning phishing attacks that simulate the chrome of the entire operating system. EDIT: Comments point out that text entry via the keyboard is still disabled, limiting the damage somewhat. # 2nd June 2008, 10:18 pm

OpenID phishing demo (via) A demonstration of the OpenID man-in-the-middle phishing attack. idproxy.net OpenIDs are immune to this particular variant due to the landing page not asking for your password (the phishing site could still provide their own redesigned landing page and hope users don’t notice though). # 28th May 2008, 8:09 am

Crossdomain.xml Invites Cross-site Mayhem. A useful reminder that crossdomain.xml files should be treated with extreme caution. Allowing access from * makes it impossible to protect your site against CSRF attacks, and even allowing from a “circle of trust” of domains can be fatal if just one of those domains has an XSS hole. # 15th May 2008, 8:06 am

Django: security fix released. XSS hole in the Admin application’s login page—updates and patches are available for trunk, 0.96, 0.95 and 0.91. # 14th May 2008, 7:49 am

Session variables without cookies. Brilliant but terrifying hack—you can store up to 2 MB of data in window.name and it persists between multiple pages, even across domains. Doesn’t work with new tabs though, and storing JSON in it and eval()ing it is a bad idea—a malicious site could populate it before sending the user to you. # 13th May 2008, 9:59 pm

How one site dealt with SQL injection attack (via) Horrifying story of developer incompetence from Autoweb: “The contractor had no idea how to find and fix the Web page vulnerability that allowed the SQL injection attack code to execute successfully.” # 2nd May 2008, 9:01 pm

Mass Attack FAQ. Thousands of IIS Web servers have been infected with an automated mass XSS attack, not through a specific IIS vulnerability but using a universal XSS SQL query that targets SQL Server and modifies every text field to add the attack JavaScript. If an app has even a single SQL injection hole (and many do) it is likely to be compromised. # 26th April 2008, 9:12 am

ISPs’ Error Page Ads Let Hackers Hijack Entire Web (via) Earthlink in the US served “helpful” links and ads on subdomains that failed to resolve, but the ad serving pages had XSS holes which could be used to launch phishing attacks the principle domain (and I imagine could be used to steal cookies, although the story doesn’t mention that). Seems like a good reason to start using wildcard DNS to protect your subdomains from ISP inteference. # 21st April 2008, 6:51 am

PayPal Plans to Ban Unsafe Browsers. At first I thought they were going to encourage real anti-phishing features in browsers, which would be a big win for OpenID... but it turns out they’re just requiring EV SSL certificates which have been proven not to actually work. # 19th April 2008, 10:45 am