Simon Willison’s Weblog

Items tagged security in Mar

Filters: Month: Mar × security ×


The unexpected Google wide domain check bypass (via) Fantastic story of discovering a devious security vulnerability in a bunch of Google products stemming from a single exploitable regular expression in the Google closure JavaScript library. # 9th March 2020, 11:27 pm

Weeknotes: datasette-ics, datasette-upload-csvs, datasette-configure-fts, asgi-csrf

I’ve been preparing for the NICAR 2020 Data Journalism conference this week which has lead me into a flurry of activity across a plethora of different projects and plugins.

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Protecting Against HSTS Abuse (via) Any web feature that can be used to persist information will eventually be used to build super-cookies. In this case it’s HSTS—a web feature that allows sites to tell browsers “in the future always load this domain over HTTPS even if the request specified HTTP”. The WebKit team caught this being exploited in the wild, by encoding a user identifier in binary across 32 separate sub domains. They have a couple of mitigations in place now—I expect other browser vendors will follow suit. # 19th March 2018, 10:21 pm

BAD TRAFFIC: Sandvine’s PacketLogic Devices Used to Deploy Government Spyware in Turkey and Redirect Egyptian Users to Affiliate Ads? “Targeted users in Turkey and Syria who downloaded Windows applications from official vendor websites including Avast Antivirus, CCleaner, Opera, and 7-Zip were silently redirected to malicious versions by way of injected HTTP redirects. This redirection was possible because official websites for these programs, even though they might have supported HTTPS, directed users to non-HTTPS downloads by default.” # 10th March 2018, 10:40 am

Upgrades to Facebook’s link security (via) Facebook have started scanning links shared on the site for HSTS headers, which are used to indicate that an HTTP page is also available over HTTPS and are intended to be cached by browsers such that future HTTP access is automatically retrieved over HTTPS instead. Facebook will now obey those headers itself and link directly to the HTTPS version. What a great idea: all sites with sophisticated link sharing (where links are fetched to retrieve extracts and images for example) should do this as well. # 5th March 2018, 3:32 pm

Plugging the CSS History Leak (via) Firefox is fixing the nefarious CSS visited link colour history leak flaw, which currently affects all browsers and allows a malicious site to determine if you have visited a specific site by checking getComputedStyle against a link to that page. It’s an obtrusive but necessary fix—visited link styles will be restricted to colour and border styles (no background images and hence no more checkbox effects since the image request could leak information) and those colours will not be reported via getComputedStyle. I hope other browser vendors follow suit. # 31st March 2010, 8:01 pm

Side-Channel Leaks in Web Applications. Interesting new security research. SSL web connections encrypt the content but an attacker can still see the size of the HTTP requests going back and forward—which can be enough to extract significant pieces of information, especially in applications that make a lot of Ajax requests. # 23rd March 2010, 4:24 pm

Facebook Adds Code for Clickjacking Prevention. Clever technique: Facebook pages check to see if they are being framed (using window.top) and, if they are, add a div covering the whole page which causes a top level reload should anything be clicked on. They also log framing attempts using an image bug. # 13th March 2010, 10:42 am

Some People Can’t Read URLs. Commentary on the recent “facebook login” incident from Jono at Mozilla Labs. I’d guess that most people can’t read URLs, and it worries me more than any other aspect of today’s web. If you want to stay safe from phishing and other forms of online fraud you need at least a basic understanding of a bewildering array of technologies—URLs, paths, domains, subdomains, ports, DNS, SSL as well as fundamental concepts like browsers, web sites and web servers. Misunderstand any of those concepts and you’ll be an easy target for even the most basic phishing attempts. It almost makes me uncomfortable encouraging regular people to use the web because I know they’ll be at massive risk to online fraud. # 2nd March 2010, 10:16 am

Pwn2Own trifecta: Hacker exploits IE8, Firefox, Safari. You just can’t trust browser security: Current versions of Safari, IE8 and Firefox all fell to zero-day flaws at an exploit competition. None of the vulnerabilities have been disclosed yet. # 19th March 2009, 3:30 pm

Understanding Bidirectional (BIDI) Text in Unicode. It turns out you need to sanitise user input to ensure there are no unicode characters that switch your site’s regular text to RTL. # 15th March 2009, 4:37 am

Chris Shiflett: My Amazon Anniversary. Chris Shiflett discloses an unfixed CSRF vulnerability in Amazon’s 1-Click feature that lets an attacker add items to your shopping basket—after reporting the vulnerability to Amazon a year ago! # 16th March 2007, 10:16 am

XSS. Sanitising HTML is an extremely hard problem. The sanitize helper that ships with Rails is completely broken; Jacques Distler provides a better alternative. # 12th March 2007, 12:34 am

Security; AJAX; JSON; Satisfaction. The JSON attack I linked to earlier only works against raw arrays, which technically aren’t valid JSON anyway. # 6th March 2007, 8:06 am

JSON is not as safe as people think it is. Joe Walker reminds us that even authenticated JSON served without a callback or variable assignment is vulnerable to CSRF in Firefox, thanks to that browser letting you redefine the Array constructor. # 5th March 2007, 10:51 pm

PHP 4 phpinfo() XSS Vulnerability. Another reason not to run an open phpinfo() page on your server. # 4th March 2007, 9:24 pm

WordPress 2.1.1 dangerous, Upgrade to 2.1.2. Helping to spread the word. You’re affected if you’ve downloaded WordPress 2.1.1 in the last three or four days. # 3rd March 2007, 8:06 am

Safe JSON (via) Subtle but important point about JSON APIs: you shouldn’t use a callback or variable assignment for JSON incorporating private user data, especially if it’s at a predictable URL. # 2nd March 2007, 1:11 pm

Usable Security: Look Beyond the “Fundamental Conflict”. Security and usability are not conflicting goals. # 18th March 2005, 2:27 am

Not linking is not security. Ridiculous: Harvard rejects applicants who “hacked” by guessing a URL. # 8th March 2005, 8:47 pm

It’s only going to get worse

This analysis of the spread of the witty worm is fascinating for a whole bunch of different reasons.

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XP Service Pack 2 Review. Several welcome security improvements for those still suffering on Windows ;) # 21st March 2004, 9:14 pm