Simon Willison’s Weblog

Blogmarks tagged scaling

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Reducing search indexing latency to one second. Really detailed dive into the nuts and bolts of Twitter’s latest iteration of search indexing technology, including a great explanation of skip lists. # 26th June 2020, 5:06 pm

PostGraphile: Production Considerations. PostGraphile is a tool for building a GraphQL API on top of an existing PostgreSQL schema. Their “production considerations” documentation is particularly interesting because it directly addresses some of my biggest worries about GraphQL: the potential for someone to craft an expensive query that ties up server resources. PostGraphile suggests a number of techniques for avoiding this, including a statement timeout, a query allowlist, pagination caps and (in their “pro” version) a cost limit that uses a calculated cost score for the query. # 27th March 2020, 1:22 am

Millions of tiny databases. Fascinating, detailed review of a paper that describes Amazon’s Physalia, a distributed configuration store designed to provide extremely high availability coordination for Elastic Block Store replication. My eyebrows raised at “Physalia is designed to offer consistency and high-availability, even under network partitions.” since that’s such a blatant violation of CAP theorem, but it later justifies it like so: “One desirable property therefore, is that in the event of a partition, a client’s Physalia database will be on the same side of the partition as the client. Clever placement of cells across nodes can maximise the chances of this.” # 5th March 2020, 4:37 am

Serving 100µs reads with 100% availability (via) Fascinating use-case for SQLite from Segment: they needed a massively replicated configuration database across all of their instances that process streaming data. They chose to make the configuration available as a ~50GB SQLite database file mirrored to every instance, meaning lookups against that data could complete in microseconds. Changes to the central MySQL configuration store are pulled every 2-3 seconds, resulting in a trade-off of consistency for availability which fits their use-case just fine. # 10th January 2020, 5:15 am

Scaling React Server-Side Rendering (via) Outstanding, detailed essay from 2017 on challenges and solutions for scaling React server-side rendering at Kijiji, Canada’s largest classified site (owned by eBay). There’s a lot of great stuff in here, including a detailed discussion of different approaches to load balancing, load shedding, component caching, client-side rendering fallbacks and more. # 30th December 2019, 10:26 pm

Vitess (via) I remember looking at Vitess when it was first released by YouTube in 2012. The idea of a proven horizontally scalable sharding mechanism for MySQL was exciting, but I was put off by the need for a custom Go or Java client library. Apparently that changed with Vitess 2.1 in April 2017, the first version to introduce a MySQL protocol compatible proxy which can be connected to by existing code written in any language. Vitess 3.0 came out last December so now the MySQL proxy layer is much more stable. Vitess is used in production by a bunch of other companies now (including Slack and Square) so it’s definitely worth a closer look. # 14th February 2019, 5:35 am

October 21 post-incident analysis (via) Legitimately fascinating post-mortem by GitHub. They run database masters in multiple data centers with raft for leader election... but when they had an unexpected network split between east and west coast they ended up with several seconds of write that had not been correctly replicated. Cleaning up the resulting mess took the best part of 24 hours! Distributed systems are hard. # 31st October 2018, 8:50 pm

Migrating Messenger storage to optimize performance (via) Fascinating case-study of a truly gargantuan migration. Messenger has over a billion users, and Facebook successfully migrated its backend storage from HBase to their MyRocks database (a fork of MySQL with a storage engine built on their SSD-optimized RocksDB key/value library) without any user-visible downtime. They ended up using two migration paths: one for the 99.9% of regular accounts, and a separate path for extremely high volume accounts (businesses with very active chat bots or support systems). # 27th June 2018, 3:05 pm

ActorDB. Distributed SQL database written in Erlang built on top of SQLite (on top of LMDB), adding replication using the raft consensus algorithm (so sharded with no single-points of failure) and a MySQL protocol interface. Interesting combination of technologies. # 24th June 2018, 9:48 pm

MySQL High Availability at GitHub. Cutting edge high availability case-study: GitHub are now using Consul, raft, their own custom load balancer and their own custom orchestrator replication management toolkit to achieve cross-datacenter failover for their MySQL master/replica clusters. # 20th June 2018, 11:05 pm

github/gh-ost: Thoughts on Foreign Keys? The biggest challenge I’ve seen with foreign key constraints at scale (at least with MySQL) is how they conflict with online schema migrations using tools like pt-online-schema-change or GitHub’s gh-ost. This is a good explanation of the issue by Shlomi Noach, one of the gh-ost maintainers. # 19th June 2018, 4:12 pm

Scaling a High-traffic Rate Limiting Stack With Redis Cluster. Brandur Leach describes the simple, elegant and performant design of Redis Cluster, and talks about how Stripe used it to scaled their rate-limiting from one to ten nodes. # 26th April 2018, 6:34 pm

Why it took a long time to build that tiny link preview on Wikipedia (via) Wikipedia now shows a little preview card on internal links with an image and summary paragraph of the linked page. As a Wikpedia user I absolutely love this feature—and as an engineer and product designer, it’s fascinating to hear the challenges they overcame to ship it. Of particular interest: actually generating a useful summary of a page, while stripping out the cruft that often accumulates at the beginning of their text. It’s also an impressive scaling challenge: the API they use for this feature is now handling more than 500,000 requests per minute. # 23rd April 2018, 9:07 pm

Scaling Postgres with Read Replicas & Using WAL to Counter Stale Reads (via) The problem with sending writes to the primary and balancing reads across replicas is dealing with replica lag—what if you write to the primary and then read from a replica that hasn’t had the new state applied to it yet? Brandur Leach dives deep into an elegant solution using PostgreSQL’s LSN (log sequence numbers) accesesed using pg_last_wal_replay_lsn(). An observer process continuously polls the replicas for their most recently applied LSN and stores them in a table. A column in the Users table then records the min_lsn valid for that user, updating it to the pg_current_wal_lsn() of the primary whenever that user makes a write. Combining the two allows the application to randomly select a replica that is up-to-date for the purposes of a specific user any time it needs to make a read. # 18th November 2017, 6:42 pm

django-multitenant (via) Absolutely fascinating Django library for horizontally sharding a database using a multi-tenant pattern, from the team at Citus. In this pattern every relevant table includes a “tenant_id”, and all queries should specifically select against that ID. Once you have that in place, you can shard your rows across multiple different databases and route to the correct database based on the tenant ID, safe in the knowledge that joins will still work provided they are against other rows belonging to the same tenant. # 16th November 2017, 9:12 pm

How Sentry Receives 20 Billion Events Per Month While Preparing To Handle Twice That. RabbitMQ federation, nginx and HAProxy, Riak as a key/value store, data processing is still mainly Python with a little bit of Rust. As of July 2017 it’s all hosted on Google Cloud Platform. # 8th November 2017, 11:32 pm

How Balanced does Database Migrations with Zero-Downtime. I’m fascinated by the idea of “pausing” traffic during a blocking site maintenance activity (like a database migration) and then un-pausing when the operation is complete—so end clients just see some of their requests taking a few seconds longer than expected. I first saw this trick described by Braintree. Balanced wrote about a neat way of doing this just using HAproxy, which lets you live reconfigure the maxconns to your backend down to zero (causing traffic to be queued up) and then bring the setting back up again a few seconds later to un-pause those requests. # 7th November 2017, 11:36 am

Scaling the GitLab database. Lots of interesting details on how GitLab have worked to scale their PostgreSQL setup. They’ve avoided sharding so far, instead opting for database pooling with pgbouncer and read-only replicas using hot standbys. I like the way they deal with replica lag—they store the current WAL position in a redis key for the user every time there’s a write, then use pg_last_xlog_replay_location() on the various replicas to check and see if they have caught up next time the user makes a request that needs to read some data. # 30th October 2017, 8:53 pm

Using MySQL as a NoSQL—A story for exceeding 750,000 qps on a commodity server. Very interesting approach: much of the speed difference between MySQL/InnoDB and memcached is due to the overhead involved in parsing and processing SQL, so the team at DeNA wrote their own MySQL plugin, HandlerSocket, which exposes a NoSQL-style network protocol for directly calling the low level MySQL storage engine APIs—resulting in a 7.5x performance increase. # 27th October 2010, 11:10 pm

Bees with machine guns! Low-cost, distributed load-testing using EC2. Great name for a useful project—Bees with machine guns is a Fabric script which fires up a bunch of EC2 instances, uses them to load test a website and then spins them back down again. # 27th October 2010, 11:04 pm

Three new features for reddit gold. Reddit’s experiments with a subscriber program are interesting to watch. 9,000 people signed up as subscribers without there being any benefit at all, and they’re now being rewarded with the ability to opt out of ads and access to computationally expensive features (like different ways of sorting their own user page) that wouldn’t scale for the entire user base. # 20th July 2010, 5:54 pm

What’s powering the Content API? The new Guardian Content API runs on Solr, scaled using EC2 and Solr replication and with a Scala web service layer sitting between Solr and the API’s end users. # 24th May 2010, 2:08 pm

twitter’s gizzard (via) Intriguing new open source project from Twitter. Gizzard is a sharding framework which provides a network service for partitioning data across arbitrary backend datastores, managing its own forwarding table to map key ranges to partitions and adding support for tree-based replication. # 11th April 2010, 9:39 pm

Notes from a production MongoDB deployment. Notes from running MongoDB for 8 months in production, with 664 million documents spread across 72 GB master and slave servers located in two different data centers. # 28th February 2010, 11:05 pm

Django Advent: Scaling Django. Mike Malone’s advice on scaling Django applications, including taking advantage of new features in 1.2. # 26th February 2010, 7:22 pm

Search Engine Time Machine. Detailed explanation of how ElasticSearch provides high availability, through clever sharding and replication strategies and configurable gateways for long-term persistent storage. # 17th February 2010, 10:32 pm

Elastic Search (via) Solr has competition! Like Solr, Elastic Search provides a RESTful JSON HTTP interface to Lucene. The focus here is on distribution, auto-sharding and high availability. It’s even easier to get started with than Solr, partly due to the focus on providing a schema-less document store, but it’s currently missing out on a bunch of useful Solr features (a web interface and faceting are the two that stand out). The high availability features look particularly interesting. UPDATE: I was incorrect, basic faceted queries are already supported. # 11th February 2010, 6:33 pm

dogproxy. Another of my experiments with Node.js—this is a very simple HTTP proxy which addresses the dog pile effect (also known as the thundering herd) by watching out for multiple requests for a URL that is currently “in flight” and bundling them together. # 3rd February 2010, 1:05 pm

PostgreSQL 8.5alpha3 now available. “Hot Standby, allowing read-only connections during recovery, provides a built-in master-slave replication solution.” Woohoo! # 23rd December 2009, 9:57 am

Django | Multiple Databases. Russell just checked in the final patch developed from Alex Gaynor’s Summer of Code project to add multiple database support to Django. I’d link to the 21,000 line changeset but it crashed our Trac, so here’s the documentation instead. # 22nd December 2009, 5:22 pm