Simon Willison’s Weblog

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Better Python Decorators with wrapt (via) Adam Johnson explains the intricacies of decorating a Python function without breaking the ability to correctly introspect it, and dicsusses how Scout use the wrapt library by Graham Dumpleton to implement their instrumentation library. # 2nd July 2020, 9:48 pm

click-app. While working on sqlite-generate today I built a cookiecutter template for building the skeleton for Click command-line utilities. It’s based on datasette-plugin so it automatically sets up GitHub Actions for running tests and deploying packages to PyPI. # 23rd June 2020, 2:21 am

Practical Python Programming (via) David Beazley has been developing and presenting this three day Python course (aimed at people with some prior programming experience) for over thirteen years, and he’s just released the course materials under a Creative Commons license for the first time. # 29th May 2020, 1:15 pm

Waiting in asyncio. Handy cheatsheet explaining the differences between asyncio.gather(), asyncio.wait_for(), asyncio.as_completed() and asyncio.wait() by Hynek Schlawack. # 26th May 2020, 3:28 pm

pyp: Easily run Python at the shell (via) Fascinating little CLI utility which uses some deeply clever AST introspection to enable little Python one-liners that act as replacements for all manner of pipe-oriented unix utilities. Took me a while to understand how it works from the README, but then I looked at the code and the entire thing is only 380 lines long. There’s also a useful --explain option which outputs the Python source code that it would execute for a given command. # 9th May 2020, 9:05 pm

A hands-on introduction to static code analysis. Useful tutorial on using the Python standard library tokenize and ast modules to find specific patterns in Python source code, using the visitor pattern. # 5th May 2020, 12:15 am

How to get Rich with Python (a terminal rendering library). Will McGugan introduces Rich, his new Python library for rendering content on the terminal. This is a very cool piece of software—out of the box it supports coloured text, emoji, tables, rendering Markdown, syntax highlighting code, rendering Python tracebacks, progress bars and more. “pip install rich” and then “python -m rich” to render a “test card” demo demonstrating the features of the library. # 4th May 2020, 11:27 pm

How to install and upgrade Datasette using pipx (via) I’ve been using pipx to run Datasette for a while now—it’s a neat Python packaging tool which installs a Python CLI command with all of its dependencies in its own isolated virtual environment. Today, thanks to Twitter, I figured out how to install and upgrade plugins in the same environment—so I added a section to the Datasette installation documentation about it. # 4th May 2020, 7:23 pm

Weeknotes: Covid-19, First Python Notebook, more Dogsheep, Tailscale

My covid-19.datasettes.com project publishes information on COVID-19 cases around the world. The project started out using data from Johns Hopkins CSSE, but last week the New York Times started publishing high quality USA county- and state-level daily numbers to their own repository. Here’s the change that added the NY Times data.

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How to cheat at unit tests with pytest and Black

I’ve been making a lot of progress on Datasette Cloud this week. As an application that provides private hosted Datasette instances (initially targeted at data journalists and newsrooms) the majority of the code I’ve written deals with permissions: allowing people to form teams, invite team members, promote and demote team administrators and suchlike.

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2020 Web Milestones (via) A lot of stuff is happening in 2020! Mike Sherov rounds it up—highlights include the release of Chromium Edge (Microsoft’s Chrome-powered browser for Windows 7+), Web Components supported in every major browser, Deno 1.x, SameSite Cookies turned on by default (which should dramatically reduce CSRF exposure) and Python 2 and Flash EOLs. # 24th January 2020, 4:43 am

Portable Cloud Functions with the Python Functions Framework (via) The new functions-framework library on PyPI lets you run Google Cloud Functions written in Python in other environments—on your local developer machine or bundled in a Docker container for example. I have real trouble trusting serverless platforms that lock you into a single provider (AWS Lambda makes me very uncomfortable) so this is a breath of fresh air. # 10th January 2020, 4:58 am

Async Support—HTTPX (via) HTTPX is the new async-friendly HTTP library for Python spearheaded by Tom Christie. It works in both async and non-async mode with an API very similar to requests. The async support is particularly interesting—it’s a really clean API, and now that Jupyter supports top-level await you can run ’(await httpx.AsyncClient().get(url)).text’ directly in a cell and get back the response. Most excitingly the library lets you pass an ASGI app directly to the client and then perform requests against it—ideal for unit tests. # 10th January 2020, 4:49 am

Better Python Object Serialization. TIL about functions.singledispatch, a decorator which makes it easy to create Python functions with implementations that vary based on the type of their arguments and which can have additional implementations registered after the fact—great for things like custom JSON serialization. # 7th January 2020, 8:35 pm

Datasette 0.31. Released today: this version adds compatibility with Python 3.8 and breaks compatibility with Python 3.5. Since Glitch support Python 3.7.3 now I decided I could finally give up on 3.5. This means Datasette can use f-strings now, but more importantly it opens up the opportunity to start taking advantage of Starlette, which makes all kinds of interesting new ASGI-based plugins much easier to build. # 12th November 2019, 6:11 am

My Python Development Environment, 2020 Edition (via) Jacob Kaplan-Moss shares what works for him as a Python environment coming into 2020: pyenv, poetry, and pipx. I’m not a frequent user of any of those tools—it definitely looks like I should be. # 12th November 2019, 1:30 am

Automate the Boring Stuff with Python: Working with PDF and Word Documents. I stumbled across this while trying to extract some data from a PDF file (the kind of file with actual text in it as opposed to dodgy scanned images) and it worked perfectly: PyPDF2.PdfFileReader(open(“file.pdf”, “rb”)).getPage(0).extractText() # 6th November 2019, 4:17 pm

Why you should use `python -m pip` (via) Brett Cannon explains why he prefers “python -m pip install...” to “pip install...”—it ensures you always know exactly which Python interpreter environment you are installing packages for. He also makes the case for always installing into a virtual environment, created using “python -m venv”. # 2nd November 2019, 4:41 pm

Streamlit: Turn Python Scripts into Beautiful ML Tools (via) A really interesting new tool / application development framework. Streamlit is designed to help machine learning engineers build usable web frontends for their work. It does this by providing a simple, productive Python environment which lets you declaratively build up a sort-of Notebook style interface for your code. It includes the ability to insert a DataFrame, geospatial map rendering, chart or image into the application with a single Python function call. It’s hard to describe how it works, but the tutorial and demo worked really well for me: “pip install streamlit” and then “streamlit hello” to get a full-featured demo in a browser, then you can run through the tutorial to start building a real interactive application in a few dozen lines of code. # 6th October 2019, 3:52 am

PyPI now supports uploading via API token (via) All of my open source Python libraries are set up to automatically deploy new tagged releases as PyPI packages using Circle CI or Travis, but I’ve always get a bit uncomfortable about sharing my PyPI password with those CI platforms to get this to work. PyPI just added scopes authentication tokens, which means I can issue a token that’s only allowed to upload a specific project and see an audit log of when that token was last used. # 1st August 2019, 4:03 pm

Using memory-profiler to debug excessive memory usage in healthkit-to-sqlite. This morning I figured out how to use the memory-profiler module (and mprof command line tool) to debug memory usage of Python processes. I added the details, including screenshots, to this GitHub issue. It helped me knock down RAM usage for my healthkit-to-sqlite from 2.5GB to just 80MB by making smarter usage of the ElementTree pull parser. # 24th July 2019, 8:25 am

PugSQL. Interesting new twist on a definitely-not-an-ORM library for Python. With PugSQL you define SQL queries in files, give them names and then load them into a module which allows you to execute them as Python methods with keyword arguments. You can mark statements as only returning a single row (or a single scalar value) with a comment at the top of their file. # 3rd July 2019, 6:19 pm

json-flatten. A little Python library I wrote that attempts to flatten a JSON object into a set of key/value pairs suitable for transmitting in a query string or using to construct an HTML form. I first wrote this back in 2015 as a Gist—I’ve reconstructed the Gist commit history in a new repository and shipped it to PyPI. # 22nd June 2019, 4:51 am

Toward a “Kernel Python” (via) Glyph makes a strong case for releasing a slimmed down “kernel” version of Python with the minimal possible standard library, and argues that the current standard library is proving impossible for a single core team to productively maintain. “If I wanted to update the colorsys module to be more modern—perhaps to have a Color object rather than a collection of free functions, perhaps to support integer color models—I’d likely have to wait 500 days, or more, for a review.” # 15th June 2019, 4 pm

quicktype code generator for Python. Really interesting tool: give it an example JSON document and it will code-generate the equivalent set of Python classes (with type annotations) instantly in your browser. It also accepts input in JSON Schema or TypeScript and can generate code in 18 different languages. # 14th May 2019, 11:35 pm

Smaller Python Docker Containers with Multi-Stage Builds and Python Wheels (via) Clear tutorial on how to use Docker’s multi-stage build feature to create smaller final images by taking advantage of Python’s wheel format—so an initial stage can install a full compiler toolchain and compile C dependencies into wheels, then a later stage can install those pre-compiled wheels into a slimmer container without including the C compiler. # 26th April 2019, 2:05 pm

An Intro to Threading in Python (via) Real Python consistently produces really comprehensive, high quality articles and tutorials. This is an excellent introduction to threading in Python, covering threads, locks, queues, ThreadPoolExecutor and more. # 18th April 2019, 5:24 am

Pyodide: Bringing the scientific Python stack to the browser (via) More fun with WebAssembly: Pyodide attempts (and mostly succeeds) to bring the full Python data stack to the browser: CPython, NumPy, Pandas, Scipy, and Matplotlib. Also includes interesting bridge tools for e.g. driving a canvas element from Python. Really interesting project from the Firefox Data Platform team. # 17th April 2019, 4:23 am

Wasmer: a Python library for executing WebAssembly binaries. This is a really interesting new tool: “pip install wasmer” and now you can load code that has been compiled to WebAssembly and call those functions directly from Python. It’s built on top of the wasmer universal WebAssembly runtime, written over just the past year in Rust by a team lead by Syrus Akbary, the author of the Graphene GraphQL library for Python. # 16th April 2019, 6:04 pm

Ministry of Silly Runtimes: Vintage Python on Cloud Run (via) Cloud Run is an exciting new hosting service from Google that lets you define a container using a Dockerfile and then run that container in a “scale to zero” environment, so you only pay for time spent serving traffic. It’s similar to the now-deprecated Zeit Now 1.0 which inspired me to create Datasette. Here Dustin Ingram demonstrates how powerful Docker can be as the underlying abstraction by deploying a web app using a 25 year old version of Python 1.x. # 9th April 2019, 5:33 pm

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