Simon Willison’s Weblog

Blogmarks tagged johnresig, javascript, jquery

Filters: Type: blogmark × johnresig × javascript × jquery ×


Dojo 1.4.1 vs jQuery 1.4.2pre on Taskspeed. John Resig’s reponse. When JavaScript libraries compete on performance, everybody wins. # 29th January 2010, 2:19 pm

jQuery.require() implementation. John Resig has added a new jQuery.require() function to a jQuery development branch, for release as part of jQuery 1.4. The commit on GitHub has an extensive discussion attached to it (scroll to the bottom). # 17th December 2009, 11:24 am

jeresig’s sizzle. Sizzle is a new selector engine (work in progress, no IE support yet) from John Resig, designed to be small, standalone, library agnostic and ridiculously fast. It should eventually replace jQuery’s current selector engine, but if it stays around 4KB it’s also going to be really useful for projects that don’t need the overhead of a full library. # 24th August 2008, 11:41 pm

querySelectorAll in Firefox 3.1. John Resig benchmarks the various JavaScript libraries’ support for querySelelectorAll, and finds an impressive 2-6x performance improvement over native DOM traversal. It’s worth clicking through to John’s experimental plugin for adding support to jQuery, which does a clever trick using __proto__ to convert the collection returned by querySelectorAll in to a jQuery object in browsers that support it. # 21st August 2008, 9:50 am

Deep Profiling jQuery Apps. Neat plugin from John Resig that monkey-patches most (all?) of the jQuery methods to build up a detailed profile of which methods are being used by a given page. # 16th June 2008, 10:20 am

Classy Query. Beautifully implemented parody of class-based JavaScript and verbose namespacing as a jQuery extension, from John Resig. The source code has some neat tricks in it, in particular the buildClass() function. # 1st April 2008, 9:48 am

Building a JavaScript Library. Slides from John Resig’s Google Tech Talk. Some great tips in here, including: make your APIs orthogonal, look for common patterns, keep things extensible and write the documentation yourself. # 24th August 2007, 4:02 pm

The website to web application gradient. Jeremy snapped this cunning illustration at my JavaScript Libraries panel at the Web 2.0 Expo. # 20th April 2007, 12:30 am

John Resig: Thoughts on OpenAjax. I hadn’t looked in to OpenAjax—from John’s analysis it seems like they need to make it easier for open-source projects to participate and do a bunch of work to modernise their core library. # 22nd February 2007, 10:20 pm