Simon Willison’s Weblog

Blogmarks tagged http in 2010

Filters: Type: blogmark × Year: 2010 × http ×


gzip support for Amazon Web Services CloudFront. This would have saved me a bunch of work a few weeks ago. CloudFront can now be pointed at your own web server rather than S3, and you can ask it to forward on the Accept-Encoding header and cache multiple content versions based on the result. # 12th November 2010, 5:33 am

LWPx::ParanoidAgent. Every programming language needs an equivalent of this library—a robust, secure way to make HTTP requests against URLs from untrusted sources without risk of tarpits, internal network access, socket starvation, weird server errors, or other nastiness. # 31st August 2010, 2:30 am

nodejitsu’s node-http-proxy (via) Exactly what I’ve been waiting for—a robust HTTP proxy library for Node that makes it trivial to proxy requests to a backend with custom proxy behaviour added in JavaScript. The example app adds an artificial delay to every request to simulate a slow connection, but other exciting potential use cases could include rate limiting, API key restriction, logging, load balancing, lint testing and more besides. # 28th July 2010, 11:34 pm

python/trunk/Lib/httplib.py in 1994 (via) Python’s original httplib implementation, checked in by Guido 16 years and 4 months ago. Not much younger than the Web itself. # 4th July 2010, 11:25 pm

Mongrel2 is “Self-Hosting”. Zed Shaw’s Mongrel2 is shaping up to be a really interesting project. “A web server simply written in C that loves all languages equally”, the two most interesting new ideas are the ability to handle HTTP, Flash Sockets and WebSockets all on the same port (thanks to an extension to the Mongrel HTTP parser that can identify all three protocols) and the ability to hook Mongrel2 up to the backend servers using either TCP/IP or ZeroMQ. I’m guessing this means Mongrel2 could hold an HTTP request open, fire off some messages and wait for various backends to send messages back to construct the response, making async processing just as easy as a regular blocking request/response cycle. # 17th June 2010, 8:11 pm

ElasticSearch memcached module. Fascinating idea: the ElasticSearch search server provides an optional memcached protocol plugin for added performance which maps simple HTTP to memcached. GET is mapped to memcached get commands, POST is mapped to set commands. This means you can use any memcached client to communicate with the search server. # 15th May 2010, 10:17 am

A HTTP Proxy Server in 20 Lines of node.js. Proxying is definitely a sweet spot for Node.js. Peteris Krummins takes it a step further, adding host blacklists and an IP whitelist as configuration files and using Node’s watchFile method to automatically reload changes to them. # 28th April 2010, 1:24 pm

Introduction to nginx.conf scripting. Slideshow—hit left arrow to navigate through the slides. The nginx community is officially nuts. Starts out with a simple “Hello world” using the echo module, then rapidly descends down the rabbit hole in to array operations, sub-requests, memcached connection pooling and eventually non-blocking Drizzle SQL execution against a sharded cluster—all implemented in the nginx.conf configuration file. # 21st April 2010, 11:40 pm

Side-Channel Leaks in Web Applications. Interesting new security research. SSL web connections encrypt the content but an attacker can still see the size of the HTTP requests going back and forward—which can be enough to extract significant pieces of information, especially in applications that make a lot of Ajax requests. # 23rd March 2010, 4:24 pm

Node.js, redis, and resque (via) Paul Gross has been experimenting with Node.js proxies for allowing web applications to be upgraded without missing any requests. Here he places all incoming HTTP requests in a redis queue, then has his backend Rails servers consume requests from the queue and push the responses back on to a queue for Node to deliver. When the backend application is upgraded, requests remain in the queue and users see a few seconds of delay before their request is handled. It’s not production ready yet (POST requests aren’t handled, for example) but it’s a very interesting approach. # 28th February 2010, 11:02 pm

Elastic Search (via) Solr has competition! Like Solr, Elastic Search provides a RESTful JSON HTTP interface to Lucene. The focus here is on distribution, auto-sharding and high availability. It’s even easier to get started with than Solr, partly due to the focus on providing a schema-less document store, but it’s currently missing out on a bunch of useful Solr features (a web interface and faceting are the two that stand out). The high availability features look particularly interesting. UPDATE: I was incorrect, basic faceted queries are already supported. # 11th February 2010, 6:33 pm