Simon Willison’s Weblog

Quotations tagged css

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Everyone is angry about CSS again. I’m not even going to try to summarize the arguments. However it always seems to boil down to the fact that CSS is simultaneously too easy to bother with, yet so hard it needs to be wrapped up in a ball of JavaScript in case it scares the horses.

Rachel Andrew # 30th January 2019, 11:14 pm

The current linkedin.com homepage clocks in at 1.9MB of CSS (156KB compressed). After re-building a fully-functional version of the homepage with CSS Blocks, we were able to serve the same page with just 38KB of CSS. To be clear: that’s the uncompressed size. After compression, that CSS file weighed in at less than 9KB!

Chris Eppstein # 24th April 2018, 8:40 pm

It’s interesting to me how much [Closure] feels like a more advanced version of Dojo in many ways. There’s a familiar package system, the widgets are significantly more mature, and Julie and Ojan’s Editor component rocks. The APIs will feel familiar (if verbose) to Dojo users, the class hierarchies seem natural, and Closure even uses Acme, the Dojo CSS selector engine.

Alex Russell # 6th November 2009, 7:35 am

I think you overstate the usefulness of the [jQuery Rules] plugin. Using this plugin, users are now limited by what selectors that can use (they can only use what the browsers provide—and are at the mercy of the cross-browser bugs that are there) which is a huge problem. Not to mention that it encourages the un-separation of markup/css/js.

John Resig # 22nd February 2009, 11:11 pm

“Why doesn’t jQuery have an XPath CSS Selector implementation?” For now, my answer is: I don’t want two selector implementations—it makes the code base significantly harder to maintain, increases the number of possible cross-browser bugs, and drastically increases the filesize of the resulting download.

John Resig # 11th February 2008, 5:31 am

If you want CSS rules to apply to unknown elements in IE, you just have to do document.createElement(elementName). This somehow lets the CSS engine know that elements with that name exist.

Sjoerd Visscher # 22nd January 2008, 8:27 pm

I don’t even use Firefox and Firebug anymore, the revised Web Inspector in Leopard has been incorporated in Coda and that does everything I need and more.

Jon Hicks # 20th December 2007, 3:09 pm

To get a better future, not only do we need a return to “the browser wars”, we need to applaud and use the hell out of “non-standard” features until such time as there’s a standard to cover equivalent functionality. Non-standard features are the future, and suggesting that they are somehow “bad” is to work against your own self-interest.

Alex Russell # 16th December 2007, 11:33 pm

[On Blueprint] I’m somewhat conflicted with its release because I don’t think it should be used. Don’t get me wrong, it’s great, but don’t use it.

Nathan Borror # 14th August 2007, 10:42 am

I’ve been in this web standards game for five years now and probably have over 100 standards-based sites under my belt. I can count the number of times I’ve be involved in a redesign where no changes were made to the markup on one finger.

Jeff Croft # 11th August 2007, 9:37 am