Simon Willison’s Weblog

Items tagged css, nataliedowne

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Going Nuts with CSS Transitions. Nat’s article for this year’s 24ways—adding special effects to images using CSS rotation, box shadows and the magical -webkit-transition property. # 14th December 2009, 1:16 pm

Styling buttons to look like links. Nat has a neat trick for styling submit buttons to look like regular links—so there’s absolutely no excuse for using a “delete” link when you should be using a POST request. # 10th June 2009, 2:11 am

TiddlyPocketBook. Paul Downey took Nat’s dinky pocketbooks CSS and combined it with TiddlyWiki to create a single page pocketbook editor. # 28th May 2009, 1:24 am

Dinky pocketbooks with WebKit transforms. Nat used 90 degree CSS transform rotations in print stylesheets for WebKit and Safari to create printable cut-out-and-fold pocketbooks from A4 pages. Very neat. # 22nd May 2009, 12:33 am

Practical, maintainable CSS (via) Nat’s posted slides and a video from her latest talk at last week’s Brighton Girl Geeks evening. # 12th March 2009, 12:46 am

CSS Systems for writing maintainable CSS. Nat has published the slides and notes from her BarCamp presentation this morning. I’m really excited about her approach, which involves designing a “CSS system” of markup patterns and CSS that embodies the design of an individual site. Future maintenance can then take this overall system in to account, which is assisted by a defined ordering system and shared vocabulary. # 28th September 2008, 11:30 pm

Back To The Future of Print. Nat’s contribution to 24 ways: a long needed update on the state of the art in print stylesheets. # 9th December 2007, 12:56 am

Natalie Downe: Inline image quotes. Neat CSS trick this one. # 22nd November 2006, 12:29 am

Girlfriend as a case study

I’ve been helping my girlfriend recreate her site using CSS and structural markup. She’s new to web design and has been taking to CSS like a duck to water—as a veteran of Microsoft Word globally defined styles come to her naturally and she took very little time to cotton on to the importance of seperating presentation from content. I’ve shown her tables as well but she isn’t really interested as she sees CSS as a much better solution for general presentation. I’m hoping to help run an HTML/XHTML/CSS training course at the University early next year with a heavy emphasis on structural markup, standards compliance and accessibility so it’s great to have a guinea pig to play with :)

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