Simon Willison’s Weblog

Blogmarks tagged c

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cosmopolitan libc (via) “Cosmopolitan makes C a build-once run-anywhere language, similar to Java, except it doesn’t require interpreters or virtual machines be installed beforehand. [...] Instead, it reconfigures stock GCC to output a POSIX-approved polyglot format that runs natively on Linux + Mac + Windows + FreeBSD + OpenBSD + BIOS with the best possible performance and the tiniest footprint imaginable.” This is a spectacular piece of engineering. # 27th February 2021, 6:02 am

Unravelling `not` in Python (via) Part of a series where Brett Cannon looks at how fundamental Python syntactic sugar works, including a clearly explained dive into the underlying op codes and C implementation. # 27th November 2020, 5:59 pm

CG-SQL (via) This is the toolkit the Facebook Messenger team wrote to bring stored procedures to SQLite. It implements a custom version of the T-SQL language which it uses to generate C code that can then be compiled into a SQLite module. # 22nd October 2020, 6:25 pm

Pikchr. Interesting new project from SQLite creator D. Richard Hipp. Pikchr is a new mini language for describing visual diagrams, designed to be embedded in Markdown documentation. It’s already enabled for the SQLite forum. Implementation is a no-dependencies C library and output is SVG. # 21st October 2020, 4:02 pm

A Compiler Writing Journey (via) Warren Toomey has been writing a self-compiling compiler for a subset of C, and extensively documenting every step of the journey here on GitHub. The result is an extremely high quality free textbook on compiler construction. # 8th January 2020, 3:33 am

Calling C functions from BigQuery with web assembly (via) Google BigQuery lets you define custom SQL functions in JavaScript, and it turns out they expose the WebAssembly.instantiate family of APIs. Which means you can write your UDD in C or Rust, compile it to WebAssembly and run it as part of your query! # 27th October 2019, 5:55 am

A Regular Expression Matcher: Code by Rob Pike, Exegesis by Brian Kernighan (via) Delightfully clear and succinct 30-line C implementation of a regular expression matcher that supports $, ^, . and * operations. # 5th December 2017, 6:36 pm

Building a GeoIP server with ZeroMQ. ZeroMQ makes it trivially easy to write a network service in raw C that makes functionality from a C library (in this case the MaxMind GeoIP library) available to clients written in many different client languages. # 9th November 2010, 9:36 am

Mongrel2 is “Self-Hosting”. Zed Shaw’s Mongrel2 is shaping up to be a really interesting project. “A web server simply written in C that loves all languages equally”, the two most interesting new ideas are the ability to handle HTTP, Flash Sockets and WebSockets all on the same port (thanks to an extension to the Mongrel HTTP parser that can identify all three protocols) and the ability to hook Mongrel2 up to the backend servers using either TCP/IP or ZeroMQ. I’m guessing this means Mongrel2 could hold an HTTP request open, fire off some messages and wait for various backends to send messages back to construct the response, making async processing just as easy as a regular blocking request/response cycle. # 17th June 2010, 8:11 pm

Redis weekly update #3—Pub/Sub and more. Redis is now a publish/subscribe server—and it ended up only taking 150 lines of C code since Redis internals were already based on that paradigm. # 30th March 2010, 3:15 pm

Mac OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard: the Ars Technica review. The essential review: 23 pages of information-dense but readable goodness. Pretty much everything I know about Mac OS X internals I learnt from reading John Siracusa’s reviews—this one is particularly juice when it gets to Grand Central Dispatch and blocks (aka closures) in C and Objective-C. # 1st September 2009, 7:05 pm

Running C and Python Code on The Web. Adobe are working on a toolchain to compile C code to target the Tamarin VM in Flash. This will allow existing C code (from CPython to Quake) to execute in a safe sandbox in the browser. # 4th July 2008, 8:26 am