Simon Willison’s Weblog

“django” in quotations

Filters: Type: quotation ×


The Google App Engine model class, db.Model, is not the same as the model class used by Django. As a result, you cannot directly use the Django forms framework with Google App Engine. However, Google App Engine includes a module, db.djangoforms, which casts between the datastore models used with Google App Engine and the Django models specification. In most cases, you can use db.djangoforms.ModelForm in the same manner as the Django framework.

Google App Engine docs # 8th April 2008, 1:48 pm

Django may be built for the Web, but CouchDB is built of the Web. I’ve never seen software that so completely embraces the philosophies behind HTTP. CouchDB makes Django look old-school in the same way that Django makes ASP look outdated.

Jacob Kaplan-Moss # 20th October 2007, 1:46 pm

It looks like the first ever Django conference will take place in early September in the San Francisco bay area.

Me, on Twitter # 7th July 2008, 5:14 pm

Years ago, Alex Russell told me that Django ought to be collecting CLAs. I said “yeah, whatever” and ignored him. And thus have spent more than a year gathering CLAs to get DSF’s paperwork in order. Sigh.

Jacob Kaplan-Moss # 21st September 2009, 6:35 pm

If you only remember one thing about handling non-HTML output via Django: know that you can use the HttpResponse object as if it were a file. Writing to such an object and returning it will give you the output you wrote. It’s a very simple concept, but one that translates well to third-party libraries.

Alex de Landgraaf # 3rd December 2007, 8:44 pm

In fact Django reminds me a bit of the character in Airplane who always answers the “what do you make of that?” question literally... “Why, I can make a hat or a brooch or a pterodactyl...”

Scott Gilbertson # 10th January 2007, 11:17 am

I can’t say enough good things about Django. Professionally, it was one of the best technical decisions that I got to make early on at Tabblo.

Antonio Rodriguez # 3rd July 2007, 1:38 am

Inline images are stored as data URI:s in the intermediate format (and usually also in the source documents), but since not all browsers support this format, the renderer replaces the data URI:s with HTTP pointers to an image cache directory.

Fredrik Lundh # 7th August 2007, 10:52 am

The key to using Wagtail effectively is to recognise that there are multiple roles involved in creating a website: the content author, site administrator, developer and designer. These may well be different people, but they don’t have to be—if you’re using Wagtail to build your personal blog, you’ll probably find yourself hopping between those different roles. Either way, it’s important to be aware of which of those hats you’re wearing at any moment, and to use the right tools for that job. A content author or site administrator will do the bulk of their work through the Wagtail admin interface; a developer or designer will spend most of their time writing Python, HTML or CSS code. This is a good thing: Wagtail isn’t designed to replace the job of programming. Maybe one day someone will come up with a drag-and-drop UI for building websites that’s as powerful as writing code, but Wagtail is not that tool, and does not try to be.

The Zen of Wagtail # 1st March 2018, 4:10 pm

DjangoCon 2008. Venue: Gooleplex, San Francisco Bay Area. Dates: 6th and 7th Sept. Official post will be on djangoproject.com soon.

Robert Lofthouse # 13th July 2008, 4:50 pm