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Amazon SimpleDB—Now With Select. So now all three of Yahoo!, Amazon and Google have invented their own SQL-like languages (YQL, SimpleDB and GQL)—though it looks like Yahoo!’s is the only one that attempts to provide joins. # 18th December 2008, 8:59 am

Yahoo! yesterday launched their new development platform for My Yahoo! and Yahoo! Mail, which uses Caja to protect users from malicious gadgets. This means Caja suddenly got 275,000,000 users. Wow! I guess this makes Caja the most widely used capability language ever.

Ben Laurie # 16th December 2008, 4:33 pm

Yahoo! Query Language Console. Neat developer tool for playing around with YQL. # 13th December 2008, 9:39 am

YQL—converting the web to JSON with mock SQL. YQL just got a whole lot more interesting to me—I had no idea they were exposing an HTML and RSS scraping tool over a JSONP API in addition to all of the Yahoo! web service methods. # 13th December 2008, 9:39 am

Yahoo, Caja, OpenSocial. Yahoo!’s new application platform uses OpenSocial, and protects itself from malicious JavaScript using Google’s Caja secure JavaScript engine. I hadn’t realised that Caja was ready for production use—this is excellent news. # 30th October 2008, 5:14 pm

Conditional classnames. Yahoo!’s internal coding standards still recommend CSS hacks over conditional comments because a separate stylesheet for IE imposes an additional HTTP request. Paul Hammond points out that you can use conditional comments to write out an extra class=“ie” attribute on the body element and use that to target the IE specific fixes in your stylesheets. # 17th October 2008, 1:32 pm

Go Get Yer Shiny New Yahoo Profile... And Make Some Connections! I’m surprised to see Yahoo! going with mutual friendships as the core of their new social platform—I’ve personally found social sites which support a one-way “follow” relationship far more useful. # 16th October 2008, 7:05 pm

Yahoo! Releases OpenID Research. Extremely valuable research, conducted with a group of typical Yahoo! users. OpenIDs usability remains bad, and if we don’t get it right soon something centralised like Facebook Connect will take over and the Web will stop being open. # 14th October 2008, 4:59 pm

Yahoo could also have followed Gmail’s lead, and disabled the security-question mechanism unless no logged-in user had accessed the account for five days. This clever trick prevents password “recovery” when there is evidence that somebody who knows the password is actively using the account.

Ed Felten # 22nd September 2008, 4:21 pm

Google wants your Hotmail, Yahoo and AOL contacts. And they’re using the password anti-pattern to get them! Despite both Yahoo! and Hotmail (and Google themselves; not sure about AOL) offering a safe, OAuth-style API for retrieving contacts without asking for a password. This HAS to be a communications failure somewhere within Google. Big internet companies stand to lose the most from widespread abuse of the anti-pattern, because they’re the ones most likely to be targetted by phishers. Shameful. # 15th September 2008, 10:39 am

Fire Eagle has launched! No need for an invite any more, hooray! # 12th August 2008, 9:33 pm

How not to apply for a job. Quite reasonably, 37signals care if job applicants get their wordmark right. Having worked for Yahoo! I know how important that ! is. What really winds me up is companies that aren’t consistent with name capitalisation across their own sites—many startups are guilty of this. # 17th June 2008, 8:22 am

There is a reason why Flickr eventually killed Yahoo! Photos and why it was decided that Google Video be relegated to being a search brand while YouTube would be the social sharing brand. The brand baggage and the accompanying culture made them road kill.

Dare Obasanjo # 16th June 2008, 2:54 pm

Reputation patterns in the Yahoo! Design Pattern Library (via) Pragmatic advice from Yahoo! on encouraging community participation. # 10th June 2008, 11:49 am

The X-Robots-Tag HTTP header. News to me, but both Google and Yahoo! have supported it since last year. You can add per-page robots exclusion rules in HTTP headers instead of using meta tags, and Google’s version supports unavailable_after which is handy for content with a known limited shelf-life. # 9th June 2008, 9:21 am

Yahoo! Address Book API Delivered. At last, now there’s no excuse to ask your users for their Yahoo! username and password just so you can scrape their address book. # 4th June 2008, 6:03 pm

Yahoo! Internet Location Platform. As an ex-Yahoo! this is really exciting—WhereOnEarth (a London company acquired by Yahoo! in 2005) provide the incredibly detailed geographical data used by Flickr, Upcoming and FireEagle—and now it’s available as an external API. # 12th May 2008, 9:02 pm

Find Your Friends. Flickr have added a characteristically classy friend import feature, pulling from Gmail, Yahoo! and Hotmail address books without any unhygienic password sharing. It’s a crying shame that the Yahoo! contacts API they are using isn’t available outside the company. # 1st April 2008, 1:01 am

An OpenSocial Foundation. “Today we are pleased to announce that Google is joining together with Yahoo! and MySpace in the creation of a non-profit foundation for the open and transparent governance of the OpenSocial specifications and intellectual property.” Good move; I’d personally love to see this happen with Google Gears. # 25th March 2008, 2:51 pm

Yahoo!’s Latest Performance Breakthroughs. 20 new performance tips to join the previously published 14. Flushing the buffer while the backend code is still working to cause the browser to start loading CSS earlier is interesting. # 20th March 2008, 3:17 pm

Introducing the Google Contacts Data API. Brilliant! (and about time)—now there’s no excuse for asking your users for their Gmail username and password so you can import contacts from their address book. Yahoo! and Microsoft need to catch up on this one fast. # 6th March 2008, 11:29 pm

Welcome to Fire Eagle! It’s launched! A service and accompanying API for saving your physical location and selectively sharing it with applications that you trust. # 5th March 2008, 7:05 pm

Interview: Simon Willison on OpenID. Christian Heilmann interviewed me for the YDN blog. # 3rd February 2008, 10:18 pm

Yahoo! OpenID Provider service now available as a public beta. This actually happened a few days ago, but I’ve been offline for the past week travelling to New Zealand and attending Kiwi Foo. # 3rd February 2008, 10:17 pm

Yahoo! supporting OpenID 2.0 but not 1.1. Yahoo!’s Allen Tom outlines the reasons Yahoo! are supporting OpenID 2.0 but not OpenID 1.1. # 19th January 2008, 9:10 am

Yahoo! OpenIDs are the same for all RPs. I had assumed that Yahoo! would be using directed identity to provide a different OpenID for each user/site combination, to prevent correlation of accounts. I was incorrect; they’re just using it for easier sign-in, with the same auto-generated URL used for every site. # 19th January 2008, 9:05 am

Yahoo!’s provider implementation only supports consumers that talk the Auth 2.0 protocol. Technically the 2.0 spec allows providers to shun 1.1, but it’s not recommended for the reason that I’m sure will become obvious once Yahoo! launches: there’s no way for your average end-user to distinguish between a 1.1 and a 2.0 implementation.

Martin Atkins # 18th January 2008, 7 am

Oh, and before anyone jumps on me about this not being “full” (meaning bi-directional) OpenID support, I’m quite aware of that. Consuming OpenID is a different beast that can’t happen overnight. Give it some time. I’m optimistic that we’ll get there.

Jeremy Zawodny # 17th January 2008, 7:05 pm

openid.yahoo.com. Yahoo!’s human readable guide to OpenID, complete with tour. It looks like they’re relying on the “sign-in seal” to protect against phishing. # 17th January 2008, 2:35 pm

A Yahoo! ID is one of the most recognizable and useful accounts to have on the Internet and with our support of OpenID, it will become even more powerful. Supporting OpenID gives our users the freedom to leverage their Yahoo! ID both on and off the Yahoo! network, reducing the number of usernames and passwords they need to remember and offering a single, trusted partner for managing their online identity.

Ash Patel # 17th January 2008, 2:31 pm