Simon Willison’s Weblog

Items tagged django in Mar, 2018

Filters: Year: 2018 × Month: Mar × django ×


Describing events in code (via) Phil Gyford built an online directory of every play, movie, gig and exhibition he has been to in the past 38 years using a combination of digital archaeology and saved ticket stubs. He built it using Django and published this piece extensively describing the process he went through to design the data model. # 28th March 2018, 3:41 pm

Building a combined stream of recent additions using the Django ORM

I’m a big believer in the importance of a “recent additions” feed. Any time you’re building an application that involves users adding and editing records it’s useful to have a page somewhere that shows the most recent objects that have been created across multiple different types of data.

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The key to using Wagtail effectively is to recognise that there are multiple roles involved in creating a website: the content author, site administrator, developer and designer. These may well be different people, but they don’t have to be—if you’re using Wagtail to build your personal blog, you’ll probably find yourself hopping between those different roles. Either way, it’s important to be aware of which of those hats you’re wearing at any moment, and to use the right tools for that job. A content author or site administrator will do the bulk of their work through the Wagtail admin interface; a developer or designer will spend most of their time writing Python, HTML or CSS code. This is a good thing: Wagtail isn’t designed to replace the job of programming. Maybe one day someone will come up with a drag-and-drop UI for building websites that’s as powerful as writing code, but Wagtail is not that tool, and does not try to be.

The Zen of Wagtail # 1st March 2018, 4:10 pm

Wagtail 2.0. The leading Django content management system just released it’s 2.0 version—now Django 2.0 and Python 3 only, and with a new rich text editor based on Draft.js. I really like Wagtail—it’s full-feature,d mature, well-documented and philosophically aligned with how I think a CMS should work. I also like this line about the new Python 3 requirement: “Call us reckless neophiles, but we think that, nine years in, Python 3 is looking pretty solid.” # 1st March 2018, 4:06 pm

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