Simon Willison’s Weblog

Items tagged node in Feb

Filters: Month: Feb × node ×


Node.js, redis, and resque (via) Paul Gross has been experimenting with Node.js proxies for allowing web applications to be upgraded without missing any requests. Here he places all incoming HTTP requests in a redis queue, then has his backend Rails servers consume requests from the queue and push the responses back on to a queue for Node to deliver. When the backend application is upgraded, requests remain in the queue and users see a few seconds of delay before their request is handled. It’s not production ready yet (POST requests aren’t handled, for example) but it’s a very interesting approach. # 28th February 2010, 11:02 pm

kriszyp’s node-promise. Another elegant approach to managing asynchronous flows in Node, including running things both in parallel and serial. # 28th February 2010, 3:50 pm

“Do” it fast! Tim Caswell’s Do library has been upgraded for compatibility with Node v0.1.30, and now has a clever Do.convert() method which wraps Node’s low-level APIs with the Do libraries “continuable” abstraction. # 22nd February 2010, 7:02 pm

node-v0.1.30 (via) A very significant new release of Node.js: the Twisted/Dojo-style Promise abstraction has been removed entirely, causing backwards incompatible changes to a bunch of core APIs. This means the pseudo-blocking Promise.wait() method is gone too, making it even harder to accidentally block your event loop. Instead, user-level libraries are encouraged to add Promise-style abstractions. I’m pleased to see Node sticking to the low-level stuff. # 22nd February 2010, 7 pm

do. A library for Node that adds a higher level abstraction for dealing with chained and parallel callbacks. # 17th February 2010, 5:43 pm

How To Node. New blog about Node.js, with a superb series of tutorials aimed at both experienced and new JavaScript developers. The stuff on managing callbacks (including running them in both series and parallel) is pretty eye-opening. # 17th February 2010, 5:42 pm

dogproxy. Another of my experiments with Node.js—this is a very simple HTTP proxy which addresses the dog pile effect (also known as the thundering herd) by watching out for multiple requests for a URL that is currently “in flight” and bundling them together. # 3rd February 2010, 1:05 pm

Plurk: Instant conversations using Comet (via) Plurk’s comet implementation sounds pretty amazing. They’re using a single quad-core server with 32GB of RAM running 8 Node.js instances to serve long-polled comet to 100,000+ simultaneous users. They switched to Node from Java JBoss/Netty and found the new solution used 10 times less memory. # 1st February 2010, 10:13 am